Juanita McGirt


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Mucv-nettv hę̄ren nettv hvtvm pumpvlhoyen,
Today we’ve been given a good day again,

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yv 2016 meskē,
it’s the summer of 2016,

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Jack Martin kihocē hvtvm
the one called Jack Martin,

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‘punvkv escvwepickv owat ‘sepuhayet mēcetv mvn em vtotkē monket owēttont on, mv hvtą
to make an audio and video recording of the conversation and we’re still working with him,

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‘punvkv cvwepicet ‘sēvnicet este-Semvnole, este-Maskokvlke, onkat ‘ste-cate omvlkat owaccat,
it will help us record the language as people talk, those of you who are Seminole or Maskoke, or all of you who are Native,

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kerrēpit kowatsket ‘sēvnicet svpaklvkvccvs kowēt mvn
with the hopes that you will keep using them,

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pum pohen mvn ‘safvcket mēcetvn kont owēs.
that’s what he asked us and we’re happy to do it.

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Onkv mucv-nettv hiyowat mv “Vpoket etem punahoyvkēts” makeyvnkē,
So today that “Let’s Sit and Talk” as we named it,

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mv Juanita McGirt mvn em punvyvhant owis, yv.
I’m going to speak with Juanita McGirt here.

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Okemah fvccvn vtēt os kowis.
I think she comes from Okemah way.

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Hvte hę̄cit owvnk’t owvyisen, ‘stv tis aren mēkusvpkv-cuko tis owē witvtēs.
I have seen her around a lot of times, at different places, maybe at church.

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Aren hēcit owak’t owisen, hvte ‘tekę̄rret owvyvnks.
I would see her, but I just recently got to know her.

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Mowisen mvn tem punahoyvhan’t owēs, hiyowat.
But now we are going to talk.

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Um, mv… este-cate estowat owetska, Semvnole, Maskoke?
Um, that… Which tribe are you, Seminole or Maskoke?

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Maskoke, Semvnole.
Maskoke and Seminole.

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Uh-huh, mvt owetskv? Uh-huh, mvt owi[s].
Uh-huh, is that what you are? Uh-huh, that’s what I am.

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Cecke ton hvtą cerke tv?
What about your mom and dad?

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Estowatet este-Maskoke onkat este-Semvnolvke owakemvte?
Which were they, Seminole or Maskoke?

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Cvcket, mv erket Yowelv Billy hocefkvt owemvts.
My mother’s father was named Yowelv Billy.

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Semvnole esfąckusat on.
A full-blood Seminole.

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Mv cvcke erke tatēt o[s].
That’s my late mother’s father.

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Uh-huh. Yowelv Billy? M-hm.
Uh-huh. Yowelv Billy? M-hm.

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Oh, hocefkv vculat owēt, Yowelv? Uh-huh.
Oh, is that an old name, Yowelv? Uh-huh.

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Hocefkv hvnkusēt owvtēt on. Uh-huh. Ohrolopē ‘towan vrēpvto[s].
It was just one name. I don’t know how many years he went by that name.

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Uh, ‘ste-hvtkvlket mv hocefkv hvnke yacvkekon.
The white people they didn’t like that one name.

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M-hm. Mv Billy emhoyvtēt ont owisen,
M-hm. So he was given that Billy,

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Epucat Billyt owvtēt on, mvn esahket, Yowelv Billy hayakvtēt ont os.
His grandfather was Billy, so they took that and changed it to Yowelv Billy.

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Oh, onkv mon, cepuse tv? Onkv cecke? Cepusetathą [owvthą]?
Oh, and what about your grandma? Or your mom? Was it possibly your grandma?

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Cvpuset uh Martha Harjo. M-hm. Mvt owvtēt ont os.
My grandma was Martha Harjo. M-hm. That was her.

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Mvo este Maskoke, Semvnole? Mv esfąckusē owvtēs.
Was she Maskoke or Seminole? She was full-blood.

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Mont cem vliketv tv?
How about your clan?

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Uh, uh.
Uh, uh.

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Eco. Eco kic’t ohketskv? Ecovlke. Uh-huh, Ecovlke. Uh-huh.
Deer. You said Deer? Deer clan. Yes, Deer clan. Uh-huh.

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Mvn oki[s]. Uh-huh.
That’s what I mean. Uh-huh.

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Ohhompetv makvhanvyisan!
I was going to say table!

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Mo[hwē]s cekowvyi[s] makvhant os cekowvyises.
That’s what I thought you were going to say.

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Uh-huh, ‘ste kihocēt onko, mv mowēn ‘stempohak’n owat? Uh-huh.
Uh-huh, isn’t that what people say if you ask them like that? Uh-huh.

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Owis, Ecovlket ont owis mak’t,
She says she is Deer clan,

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mvt em vliketvt owvcok’t owisen,
that’s her clan,

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ohhompetvn makvhanvyis maktok.
but she almost said she was at a table, she says.

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Onkv mvn nake te, nak vkvsvmkv owat?
And so, what is it called, faith and such?

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Pum vkvsvmkv owat ocēt svpaklvkēt owēt onkv,
We all have a certain faith,

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mowēt owvkvccvs pukihocvtē. Uh,
so they told us that we must be this way. Uh,

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nake te? Cuko-rakko onkat,
what is it? Like the ceremonial grounds,

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cuko-rakko ennekēyetv [meant: em vpēyetv] onkv em mowakē ‘pvnakē ‘shvyvtkakē fullat,
where they go about and dance all night,

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uh mvo aretskvtēt owv? M-hm.
did you go to things like that? M-hm.

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Aretskvtēt owv? M-hm, Greenleaf, ‘shvyvtketv.
Did you attend? Yes, Greenleaf, all night.

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Ēkvnv likat mvt, mvt punaket owēs. Uh-huh.
Where that ground sits, that’s ours.

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Pum ēkvnvn ohlikēt ont on.
It’s sitting on our land.

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Mvt uh, este-cate maketv, Vsse Lanvpe? M-hm. Mvt owv? M-hm. Vsse Lanvpe mvt owv?
In the language, it’s Vsse Lanvpe? M-hm. That’s it? M-hm. Vsse Lanvpe, is that it?

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Onkv mv, mon ąrvtet–kot–aretskē monkvt owv?
So you used to go there or do you still go there now?

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Um, mēkusvpkv-cuko min arvyēt owemvts.
Um, I went to church instead.

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Mvn likēt ont owat kērret ont owvyisen, momvhocv este hēcit,
But I still know that the stomp ground is there, and once in a while, I’ll go see people,

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Hoktvke pvnkvn mahoken mvn hecetv cvyacat mon ayimvts. Uh-huh.
and when they say there’s a Ribbon dance, I wanted to see it, so I went. Uh-huh.

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Mowis, ‘pvnvkot owē[s].
But I don’t dance.

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Mon mv, hiyowat mv mēkusvpkv-cuko mvn oh-vyēpetskvtēt owētok
Nowadays, since you went to church,

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hiyowat mvn vkvsvmkv ocet,
since your faith is in your church,

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mowis mvo ‘towēsekot owētok hokkolen owak’n owat mvo,
it would seem fine if you attend both,

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este hę̄ret huervhanvkēt owvtēs kont vkerricēt owē tis,
I always thought that you would be a good person [if you attend either one],

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you know este ētvt [m]vrahkv vkerricakat tayekot os konhǫyis owēt owē tisen, vntat
you know other people, when they think about it, they think it’s not good to go, but myself,

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este-catet owēpeyat punhę̄rvhanat owēs kowvyētok,
we who are Natives, it should be good for us, is what I think,

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fekhvmketv ocet hueret owvhanvkat.
we should feel pride in that.

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Owisen mv mēkusvpkv-cuko estvmimvn aret owetskemvte,
Now talking about church, where did you used to go,

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onkv hiyowat em monket?
or are you still going now?

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Cvcųtkuse monkvn cvpuset Apehkv church mv ‘svcayen, hofone vrvtēt ont on.
When I was little, my grandma took me to Arbeka church, and she had gone there a long time.

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Mv ‘svcayen arin mv takfettvn cvtak-vculvtēt on.
She took me and I grew up in that church yard.

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Mv estvmi fvccvn likēt owa, mv mēkusvpkv-cuko?
Which direction is that church?

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Okemah enhvsvlatkv fvccv vkērkv cenvpaken. M-hm.
West of Okemah, eight miles.

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Aksonkvlket owv–kot–ēohkvl–.
Is it Baptist–no–Methodist?

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Ohkalvlke. M-hm. Ohkalvlke mvt owvcoks.
Methodist. M-hm. She said she’s Methodist.

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Monkv mvn ąret ‘ceculvtēt ont on oketskv? M-hm.
That’s where you grew up, you mean? M-hm.

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Onkv mv mēkusvpkv-cuko onkat mēkusapv enhueretv omvlkv mv kērretskēt owv,
So do you know the all the beliefs of the church or a Christian,

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mv estowēt vretvt owat mēkusvpkv-cuko? Mv…
how things are done in the church? That…

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Cvpuset vm punąyet owemvts.
My grandma always used to talk to me.

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“Heyv mowē vretv tat hę̄ret ont os” maket,
“To go this way is good,” she’d said,

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um,

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hę̄ren nak este em vnicet,
it’s good to help people,

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hę̄ren Hesaketvmesē,
it is good,

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em vtotket vyetvt vhę̄ret ont owisen,
to do God’s work,

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monkot ont on owan os este cekicvkvrēs.
but there will be some people who will tell you that it is not.

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Momo estowis vtǫtketskēs nak cem momaken
As you keep working, there will be issues that come your way,

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nak hę̄r–yv fvccvt vyetv hę̄r’t o[s] mahokvtē,
but this way is better, is what they had said,

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owvnkv nakston cvmont owv? vm mont owv? kowetskē ocvrēs.
so there will be some days when you will wonder why is this or these things happening to me?

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Oketv vnnvcowēn mowvrēs maket,
there will be a lot of times that will happen, she said,

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mont owisen, ēwihkeccvs.
but don’t ever give up.

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M-hm. Ąyē monkvccvs
M-hm. Keep going.

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Ąyē monk[ec]cen, nak omv̨lkvt hoyvnēn owat,
Keep going and when things pass,

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yv fvccvt vyetvt owvtē tayen kērretskvrēs.
you will know that it was the right way to go.

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‘Ste kicēt owemvts.
She used to tell people that.

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M-hm. Yv mahǫkēt owemvts.
M-hm. They always used to say that.

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‘Sten–nake, este ‘mvcahnąket, ‘ste yekcicąket owemvtes.
They used to encourage people and make people feel stronger.

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Monkv mv hvtvm you know uh mv cepuse onkv cecke tis owēpē witvtēs,
So again you know your grandma or maybe your mother,

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uh mēkusvpkv-cuko enhueretv uh
uh the beliefs of the church,

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mv taklike,
the bread,

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uh nake te? mv nettv pvrko-opuswv tis ǫhą? mv nvkvftetv-rakko kihocvnto?
What is it? That day, wine is it? The one they used to call the big meeting?

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Mowē ocakat uh mv taklike takuecetv,
When they have that, to prepare the [communion] bread,

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mv hayvtēt owemvte?
did she make that?

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Onkv estowatet?
Or which one [made it]?

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Hayetot, cvcke. Oh, cecke?
She made it, my mother did. Oh your mom?

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Hokkolen mowis cvcke mvtot, mvtvlkus mēc’t owvhēs mahokēt on huerihocēt on mēcēt owemvts.
Two of them, but my mother would be the only one to do this.

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Mv hoktvke enhomahtv onkat hoktvke ‘makhotv makē owēt okhoyemvts.
The women leaders or the women in front is what I think they used to call them.

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M-hm, hoktvke.
M-hm, the women.

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uh
uh

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mvn kic’t okhoyēt owv?
Is that what they say?

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Hoktvke enhomahtv owēt mēkusvpkv-cuko ‘skerkvkē vpohoyēt onko?
The women leaders of the church, the ones they seat in a certain place?

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Uh-huh, hiyowē. Uh. Mvt owemvte?
Uh-huh, like this. Is that what she was?

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Mvt owv kerrvkot owisen, mvt Aksonkvlke em vyetvn ohkvcen?
I don’t know what that is, are you talking about Baptist ways?

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Uh-huh mvn okis, vnet uh.
Uh-huh, that’s what I mean, myself.

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Ohkalvt mv mēcakvtē kerraks.
Methodists, I don’t know if they did that.

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Oh, monkot owv? Hunh-uh. Kērrvyē sekatēs. Oh.
Oh, they don’t do that? Hunh-uh. I didn’t know that. Oh.

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Owisen mvn taklike mv hayetv mvn mēcēt owemvte?
But did she make the bread that way?

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M-hm. Onkv mv tv eskērken hayvkēt owv?
M-hm. So do they make that a certain way?

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Mv hoktē mowēn hayvccvs kicet mvn huericvkēt ont owat
If they have appointed one woman to make it,

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mvt eskērken hayakēt owv?
do they make it a certain way?

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Mv hvte-hąkus[ēn] alihket,
She got up early in the morning,

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este lomhēpē monken alihket,
while people are still sleeping, she got up,

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takuecepvtē hēcvyēt owemvtok. M-hm.
and she had already prepared it when I saw her. M-hm.

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Mv hoktvle hvnket, vnhoktalat kicē witē, mvt uh,
My mother-in-law, when she did it,

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mvt Aksomkvlk’t owemvt ont owisen, mvt uh
she was a Baptist, but

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taklike mowēn hayēt owemvts.
she used to make the bread like that.

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Owen mvt hvse-vkērkv hvthąyvtkusat
She’d get up really early in the morning,

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hokkolat ennvrkvpv mahē tis alihket,
around 2:30 in the morning, she’s get up,

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maket owemvts, mv, enhvyvtke, enhvyątkusat mv mahe.
she said, in the morning, in the very early morning.

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Mv mahē owē tis owvthą?
Was it around that time?

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Uh, hvt–..ę̄ hvyatkusen mēc’t o hēcimvtisen,
Uh, I just saw her do it early, but

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hompekot, hompeko monket,
she didn’t eat, while not eating,

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nak omvlkvn mvtan takuehcet,
she prepared everything first,

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nak celayetv ocen owat, mv mēcvhanat mv Tvcakuce vrahkvtok.
if she had other things to do, she would do that first for that Sunday.

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Mv mēcvhanat mvn mēcēt on hēcimvtoki[s].
If she had to do that, I used to see her doing it.

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Ohwen mv, hvtą
And also,

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entv̨lkusēt c[vy]ąyakusof mvn mēcēt on, mēcetvt owēs maket,
she would do it, you’re supposed to do it by yourself when it was quiet, she said,

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mēkusvpkv esfvckē maket, onayemvtes.
full of prayer, she said, she used to tell.

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Mv mowen mēcet owvt[ē]tvlkēs.
She used to do it like that.

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Mowis centv mv hayetskēt owv?
But what about you, do you make it?

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‘Towusat ha[ye]t owvyisen,
Sometimes I make it,

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svmon hayvkot.
but I don’t make it much.

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Oh hoktē hvnken mowepeko ta[ye]t owat mvn,
Oh, when another lady is not able to do it,

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cem pohoyēt owv? M-hm.
they ask you? M-hm.

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Mowet mowis owēt owēs. Vyoposkv kihocvnto? M-hm.
Sometimes it happens. Are you what they called a substitute?

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00:10:14,459 –> 00:10:21,629
‘Stekihocan mv ‘stem pohoyvnt owes vm mēcvkēt owēs.
When they ask you, you do it.

143
00:10:21,629 –> 00:10:30,307
Onkv hę̄re-mahen mv ohfvccv pum onayehceccekv– pum opunvyehcetskekv.
You have told us very well about that–talked to us about it.

144
00:10:30,307 –> 00:10:38,308
Onkv pum onayet hiyowat mv mēkusvpkv-cuko Apehkv Ohkalvlke,
Now that church, Arbeka Methodist,

145
00:10:38,308 –> 00:10:46,729
uh mv mēkusvpkv-cuko arvtet maketskat, mv mēkusvpkv-cuko hvtą Okemah fvccvn mvn likēt os kic’t oketsken,
that church you said you went to, you said it was toward Okemah,

146
00:10:46,729 –> 00:10:50,689
uh estofv-mahen hahoyvtēt owē tē, mvt?
about when did they build it?

147
00:10:50,689 –> 00:10:59,789
Ohrolopē cokpe-rakko hvnken cokpe cenapaken pale-ost… pale-cenvpaken ostohkaken mv
In the year 1884.

148
00:10:59,789 –> 00:11:07,766
ohrolopē mvn ha– vlicēhocvtēt ont on: 1884.
That’s the year they started: 1884.

149
00:11:07,766 –> 00:11:14,943
Owen mv ohlik’tv-ohlikv onkv hvtecę̄skusē ‘svlilēcat uh estimvt owvtēt owvtē?
And the very first pastor who started the church, who was he?

150
00:11:14,943 –> 00:11:18,223
Este mvnettēt arēt ont, mv.
He was a young guy.

151
00:11:18,223 –> 00:11:23,647
mēkusvpkv-cuko tempusan ecket likēt hofonof mv
His mother lived real close to the church a long time ago,

152
00:11:23,647 –> 00:11:30,868
cvhecikvrǫnkon fullē witvtē[s]. Mvn ecket likēt on,
they were probably there before I was born. His mother lived there,

153
00:11:30,868 –> 00:11:32,259
arēt on.
and he was around there.

154
00:11:32,259 –> 00:11:36,191
mvt ‘stǫfis mēkusvpkv-cuko vhuerēt owemvts.
He came to church all the time.

155
00:11:36,191 –> 00:11:41,800
Mv tat ētv erkenakē ayvtē kerraks, mv tvlkusen arēt on.
If he went to other churches to preach, I don’t know, he only went there.

156
00:11:41,800 –> 00:11:43,750
Tingo Frank hocefkvt owemvts.
Tingo Frank was his name.

157
00:11:43,750 –> 00:11:47,717
Mm, Tingo Frank? M-hm.
Mm, Tingo Frank? M-hm.

158
00:11:47,717 –> 00:11:51,799
Mv este Maskoket owvt hą? M-hm.
Was he Maskoke? M-hm.

159
00:11:51,799 –> 00:11:54,763
Owen ąyen uh,
Then as time passed,

160
00:11:54,763 –> 00:11:57,642
mv ‘stimv ētv vyoposkvtē tv? Mv tv?
did anybody else take his place?

161
00:11:57,642 –> 00:12:00,473
Erkenvkvlke sulkē.
A lot of preachers.

162
00:12:00,473 –> 00:12:10,676
‘Stit enhvteceskv tat kerraks, mvn mv[mah ē]. 1884 tatētok. Mowis enrora[fkat]– renyopv tat sulkē.
I don’t know who the first one was, back then. It was 1884. But after that, there were a lot:

163
00:12:10,676 –> 00:12:15,699
Jimmy Chupco tis, Newman Long tis. M-hm.
Jimmy Chupco. Newman Long. M-hm.

164
00:12:15,699 –> 00:12:21,432
George Long, Tony Hill, Pete Miller, Austin Bell.
George Long, Tony Hill, Pete Miller, Austin Bell.

165
00:12:21,432 –> 00:12:33,192
Austin Bell mvt, ‘ste-hvtke ‘punvkv tv̨lkus owen ‘serkenaket ont owisen, ‘te-hvtke em punvkv min ‘serkenaken,
That Austin Bell, he only preached in English, he preached in English,

166
00:12:33,192 –> 00:12:38,425
vyēcicen, erke mv ‘ste-catet owvtētis onkv.
as he went on, his dad was an Indian, so

167
00:12:38,425 –> 00:12:43,696
Mv, mata fullēt em punahoyat iesenkerrēpē haken aret.
he hung around and listened to the other men talk and he was learning it.

168
00:12:43,696 –> 00:12:50,802
Ohrolopē hokkolen ahret vyēpof, cvckucet vcak-vyēpvtēt o[s].
When he had been there two years, my aunt left with him.

169
00:12:50,802 –> 00:12:58,371
‘Tehvlvtepihohcen, espum vyēpemvts.
They got married, and he took her away from us. Oh.

170
00:12:58,371 –> 00:13:03,000
Mv, let’s see Tony Hill kiceccat, mv hocefhoyat pohvyvtēt os.
That Tony Hill you mentioned, I’ve heard him named.

171
00:13:03,000 –> 00:13:09,662
Owen hvtvm Newman Long vculvke opunvyēcaket fullat pohvyvtēt os.
And that Newman Long, I used to hear elders mention him.

172
00:13:09,662 –> 00:13:15,186
Hvtą, ‘ti ētvn kic’t okeccv? Oh, Pete Miller. Pete Miller.
Again, who else did you say? Oh, Pete Miller. Pete Miller.

173
00:13:15,186 –> 00:13:16,941
Mvn hocefhoyat pohvyvtēt os.
I used to hear him named.

174
00:13:16,941 –> 00:13:18,938
Jeffrey Smith tv?
What about Jeffrey Smith?

175
00:13:18,938 –> 00:13:25,463
Mmm, mvt Castle fvccvn ak-vpokakat, mvt ohą? No.
Mmmm. Is he one of them that lives around Castle? No.

176
00:13:25,463 –> 00:13:28,506
Um,
Um,

177
00:13:28,506 –> 00:13:37,044
Yeager, Yeager yv enkvsvppof’ fvccv enlikēt owemvts. Oh, uh-huh.
Yeager. North of Yeager is where he lived. Oh, uh-huh.

178
00:13:37,044 –> 00:13:40,721
Uewohkuce kihocen mēkusvpkv-cuko likēt owē[s], mv
There’s a church named Wewohkuce down by there.

179
00:13:40,721 –> 00:13:42,931
mvn ar’t owemvts. M-hm.
That’s where he was. M-hm.

180
00:13:42,931 –> 00:13:44,564
Alfred Harjo?
Alfred Harjo?

181
00:13:44,564 –> 00:13:47,486
Mm, mvn pohvyvt[ē]t owis owēs
Mm, I might’ve heard of him.

182
00:13:47,486 –> 00:13:52,992
M-hm. Owisen mvt Okcvn-Hvcce Ohkalv mvn ar’t owemvts.
M-hm. But he was from Salt Creek Methodist.

183
00:13:52,992 –> 00:13:58,464
James Yeager? M-hm, mvo kēr[rit], vculet arēmvts.
James Yeager. I remember him, he was an elder.

184
00:13:58,464 –> 00:14:01,320
Hvte vm mvnettvhąnusof. M-hm.
When I was younger. M-hm.

185
00:14:01,320 –> 00:14:04,440
Hiyowat cvhoktvlēpē ont o[s].
Now I’m old!

186
00:14:04,440 –> 00:14:06,114
Woodrow Haney?
Woodrow Haney?

187
00:14:06,114 –> 00:14:08,993
Uh-huh, mvn kērris, mvo.
Uh-huh, I know him.

188
00:14:08,993 –> 00:14:10,171
Sam Haney?
Sam Haney?

189
00:14:10,171 –> 00:14:11,776
Uh-huh, mvo kērris.
Uh-huh, I know him.

190
00:14:11,776 –> 00:14:13,187
Vernon Haney?
Vernon Haney?

191
00:14:13,187 –> 00:14:16,971
Uh, ‘stowusat, uh-huh ‘stowat owat kērris.
Uh, a little, uh-huh, I know which one he is.

192
00:14:16,971 –> 00:14:19,672
M-hm. Mvn hofonēn pum ar’t owemvts.
M-hm. He was with us a long time.

193
00:14:19,672 –> 00:14:22,321
Ohrolopē cahkēpat mahē ‘pupakemvts.
He was with us for about five years.

194
00:14:22,321 –> 00:14:25,454
Vpēhohuecēt ohrolopē hvnkat mahen,
They used to send them off after about a year,

195
00:14:25,454 –> 00:14:30,121
vpēhuehocēt owemvtan omvt[s]. Hofonē pum vrētt owemvts.
then they used to transfer them, but he stayed with us for a long time.

196
00:14:30,121 –> 00:14:32,000
William Smith?
William Smith?

197
00:14:32,000 –> 00:14:39,116
Mvn kerre-mahvko[t os kowi]. Jeffrey Smith kiceyvnkē, mv erket owemvts. Oh.
I don’t think I know him. Jeffery Smith was his father. Oh.

198
00:14:39,116 –> 00:14:41,857
Onkv sulkē hayēt owēt, tonko? M-hm.
So there was a whole lot. M-hm.

199
00:14:41,857 –> 00:14:46,615
Ę̄ hecakvyowen, yvhikakē vpokat tis hecakvyēt owen
I could just almost see them sitting there singing

200
00:14:46,615 –> 00:14:49,557
heyv oh-onayat hēcvyis.
as I was reading this.

201
00:14:49,557 –> 00:14:51,123
Mike Harjo?
Mike Harjo?

202
00:14:51,123 –> 00:14:53,205
Uh-huh, kērris. Mv sonkētt owvnkv?
Uh-huh, I know him. Did he pass away?

203
00:14:53,205 –> 00:14:56,744
Uh-huh. Hvtewǫlusen sonkētt owvnk[s]. M-hm.
Uh-huh. Just a little while ago. Mm-hm.

204
00:14:56,744 –> 00:15:00,483
Jackson Deer?
Jackson Deer?

205
00:15:00,483 –> 00:15:05,203
Kērris kowi[s], mv um,
I might have known him. Um,

206
00:15:05,203 –> 00:15:11,321
hoktvke hokkolen ocēt owemvts kowvyē[s], mvte? Mv toko?
I thought he had two daughters? Is that him? Or not?

207
00:15:11,321 –> 00:15:20,503
Kerrvkot os, mowis cvcke nahvnke mahusat on, uh,
I don’t know exactly, but he’s my mom’s kinfolk, uh

208
00:15:20,503 –> 00:15:26,226
Ocēpvttis owētis ‘punayēcat pohvyvtēs[eko]. M-hm.
He might’ve had them, but I never did hear him talk about them.

209
00:15:26,226 –> 00:15:31,849
Erkenvkvlke sųlkē mv mēkusvpkv-cuko fullvtē,
There were a lot of preachers who came through that church,

210
00:15:31,849 –> 00:15:36,587
mv ‘svlilēcvtē mvn hocefhuecet oketskes. M-hm.
you’re naming off all of those that started and took part in the church. M-hm.

211
00:15:36,587 –> 00:15:44,572
Sulkē ropotē– mv sulkē ropotecēpvtē tis kerrvkot owis mv ę̄ akerrvyē hakof mvn.
There were a lot of them–there were a lot of them that went through that I didn’t know, but I know of some now.

212
00:15:44,572 –> 00:15:48,945
M-hm. Mv, mvt ropotēcvtēt on.
M-hm. Those are the ones that went through.

213
00:15:48,945 –> 00:15:54,627
‘Sesten– ‘Sestvwoskusē hakof, vpēhoyecephoyen. M-hm.
Just when you were getting used to them, they would get sent off. M-hm.

214
00:15:54,627 –> 00:15:57,639
Ētvn enhuehketv
When the others are called away

215
00:15:57,639 –> 00:16:00,184
kihocen, vpēyet owvt hą, mv?
as they say, is that why they left?

216
00:16:00,184 –> 00:16:06,013
M-hm, mēkusvpkv-cuko ētvn ‘tohtvlhuehocen vpēyet owvtē[s].
M-hm, they sent them to from one church to another.

217
00:16:06,013 –> 00:16:11,108
Onkv mv ‘ste sųlkēt cenahvnkvlket owakat, mv fullet,
So there were many who went there who were your kinfolk,

218
00:16:11,108 –> 00:16:16,255
onkat Haneys kicakhoyat fullen, Deer kihocak’ mvo fullakes.
like the Haneys and then there are the Deers.

219
00:16:16,255 –> 00:16:22,650
‘Ste sulkēt cenahvmvlket owvkēt vtēhket owemvte[s], mv mēkusvpkv-cuko.
A lot of the members that were sort of your kinfolks were in that church.

220
00:16:22,650 –> 00:16:31,086
Vketēcvkat, family hvnkusit owusēt vlicēcakvtēt ont owv? kont vkerricvyēt ont o[s].
As you look into it, I wonder whether just one family started it.

221
00:16:31,086 –> 00:16:41,409
Owen hvtą ‘setoh– uh, nake te?–etohtvlket hvtą sųlkē ‘tepvkaket fullet tohtvlkaket owat.
And–what is it called?–they started gathering and a lot of them got married and went on and got together.

222
00:16:41,409 –> 00:16:46,435
Heyv Frank kicvyisē, Tingo Frank, mv ecke,
Those Franks that I mentioned, Tingo Frank, his mother,

223
00:16:46,435 –> 00:16:53,572
‘puetake hoktvke tuccēnen owemvts kowvyē, cēpvnvke tuccēnen, mv
they had three daughters, I think, and three boys,

224
00:16:53,572 –> 00:16:56,897
mvtēkus esvlicēcakattowv? kowvyēt os. M-hm.
and I’ve wondered if those were the only ones that started it. M-hm.

225
00:16:56,897 –> 00:17:01,686
Mvt vyēcicen este ētvo, em pohvttaken roricet,
As they carried on, they invited other people, and as they came,

226
00:17:01,686 –> 00:17:04,180
fulletv vlicēcvtēt ont o[s]. Uh-huh.
they started attending there. Uh-huh.

227
00:17:04,180 –> 00:17:11,702
‘Ste hvnke mv–nake te?–uh, Jerry Haney kicē, mv mēkko, ar’t owv?
There was one person–what is it?–uh Jerry Haney, that chief, was he there?

228
00:17:11,702 –> 00:17:17,281
Mvt Hecete Methodist mvn arēt owvtet makēt owvnk[s]. Mvo.
He said he belonged to Hitchiti Methodist.

229
00:17:17,281 –> 00:17:23,600
Mv hvpo hę̄rat sulkēt ę̄ ‘svtakhvkēt svmpalofket owemvts makēt owvnk[s]. M-hm.
He said there were camphouses that went all around. M-hm.

230
00:17:23,600 –> 00:17:30,139
Centv? Mv Apēhkv uh mēkusvpkv-cuko ēyohkalvlke,
And you? At that Arbeka Methodist church,

231
00:17:30,139 –> 00:17:32,722
mv tv, hvpo sųlkēt owemvte?
were there a lot of camphouses there?

232
00:17:32,722 –> 00:17:33,729
Mowēt owemvtes.
There used to be.

233
00:17:33,729 –> 00:17:38,757
Hiyowat este-hvtke ‘semvyē vlicēcvkēpat,
Nowadays they’ve started services like the white man,

234
00:17:38,757 –> 00:17:42,542
mv hompetv-cuko-rakko min hayahket, mvn
they built a large dining space instead,

235
00:17:42,600 –> 00:17:47,515
omvlkvt hompetv ‘setohkvlket hompakē hakēt on. M-hm.
and that’s where they all bring food and eat together. M-hm.

236
00:17:47,515 –> 00:17:54,060
Mowis mv hvte aceculē areccat uh mv hvpo mowēt owemvte? M-hm.
But when you were growing up, were the camphouses like that?

237
00:17:54,060 –> 00:18:00,039
Sulke cenahvmkvlke mvo hvtą ceckuce owvkē tis onkat uh,
A lot of your relatives, like your aunts or uh,

238
00:18:00,039 –> 00:18:01,040
uh
uh

239
00:18:01,040 –> 00:18:05,145
naket? cenahvmke mąhusat, cepvwv enake tis,
what is it? your own family, your uncle’s, also,

240
00:18:05,145 –> 00:18:09,156
ceckuce owakat mvn ocak’n owat mvn. ‘Ste-hvpo.
your aunt and such, if they had one. A camphouse.

241
00:18:09,156 –> 00:18:12,037
Uh-huh, ‘toh-aretskēt owemvte? M-hm.
Uh-huh, did you go from one to another? M-hm.

242
00:18:12,037 –> 00:18:17,594
Mv ‘tenahvnkucvlke ‘tem akkopąnē fullvkēt owemvtok. M-hm.
We used to play with our little cousins. M-hm.

243
00:18:17,621 –> 00:18:23,054
Owen mowēt ąyen mv mēkusvpkv-cuko ‘sohrakket vyę̄pvtēt owemvts. M-hm.
We kept going on like that, and the church grew bigger and went on and on. M-hm.

244
00:18:23,054 –> 00:18:25,743
Mv okvyat, mv Tingo okvyate,
The one I was talking about, that Tingo I was talking about,

245
00:18:25,743 –> 00:18:33,564
ecket Apehkv hiyowē likat enlekothof’ fvccv vkērkv tuccēnen
his mother had land three miles south of where Arbeka is now,

246
00:18:33,589 –> 00:18:36,250
cukon– ēkvnvn ocēt on,
and there was a house there,

247
00:18:36,250 –> 00:18:41,500
mv cuko likēt on, mvn ecket enlikēt arēt owvtēt on.
and he lived with his mother.

248
00:18:41,500 –> 00:18:46,666
Mowof, “Mēkusvpkv ‘svpokepvkē ta[ye]t os” kicen.
Then, she told him, “We could be having church here., she told him.

249
00:18:46,666 –> 00:18:51,074
Aksonkvt owvtē[s], mv ecke tat, kicen vyē–
She was a Baptist, and she told him we could be having service–

250
00:18:51,074 –> 00:18:53,918
Em oh-vkvsahmet, este vteloket,
He agreed, and people started gathering,

251
00:18:53,918 –> 00:18:59,523
nvkvfketv ocaket mēkusvpkv hayaken vpoket,
and they had meetings and prayer service,

252
00:18:59,523 –> 00:19:02,249
vwahet fullēt owvtēt on.
and then would dismiss.

253
00:19:02,249 –> 00:19:08,623
Uh, naket hocefkvt os kowat–
Uh, I forgot what his name is–

254
00:19:08,623 –> 00:19:12,189
Jacob Knight. Mvt hocefkvt,
Jacob Knight. That was his name,

255
00:19:12,189 –> 00:19:18,205
erkenvkv Aksonkv erkenvkv mvt arēt owvtet, rem or’t on.
he was a Baptist preacher that was around and he went there and visited with him.

256
00:19:18,205 –> 00:19:23,058
“Mowēn mēkusvpkv ‘svpokepvkē ta[ye]t os, cencukon” kicen,
He told him, “We could be having church at your home,”

257
00:19:23,058 –> 00:19:24,875
‘moh-vkvsahmen,
and he agreed,

258
00:19:24,875 –> 00:19:27,481
mon vlicēcaket fullof, hvtą
and when they started going there,

259
00:19:27,481 –> 00:19:31,204
erkenvkv hvnken mvt ohkalvt rem orahken.
there was one preacher that went to see them, he was a Methodist preacher.

260
00:19:31,204 –> 00:19:33,912
‘Tem vtotkaket ‘svhoyen,
They worked along together,

261
00:19:33,912 –> 00:19:41,097
nak ‘stowaten–nak ‘stohwen owat kerrvkekon, mv Jacob Knight kicvyat arvtē wikehpen,
they didn’t know what had happened, but for some reason, that Jacob Knight stopped coming,

262
00:19:41,127 –> 00:19:48,392
uh Little, Little hocefkvt, Thomas Little.
and Little, his name was Little, Thomas Little.

263
00:19:48,392 –> 00:19:52,357
Mvt ‘svlicehcet entvlkusēn hahket, mv Ohkalvt on,
He started it and was left by himself, he was a Methodist,

264
00:19:52,357 –> 00:19:54,937
entvlkusēn hahket ‘saren.
and he was left by himself to carry it on.

265
00:19:54,937 –> 00:20:02,177
Hofone-mahekon mv hoktē encuko mv nvkvftetv hayakat,
Before long the woman’s house they used to gather at,

266
00:20:02,177 –> 00:20:06,925
mēkusvpkv-cuko Apehkv hocefakvtēt ont on.
they named it Arbeka church.

267
00:20:06,925 –> 00:20:10,478
Oh, onkv mv hvnken ‘svlilēcvnton?
Oh, so it started with that one?

268
00:20:10,478 –> 00:20:13,588
Hvtą yekcetv ocvkē onkat,
If they were getting more spiritually filled, or

269
00:20:13,588 –> 00:20:18,627
‘sēmvhayet mēkusvpkv owat ofvn hę̄ren huer’t ont owat kowet, mvn
as he practiced to be in good standing in their faith,

270
00:20:18,627 –> 00:20:25,281
vrakkueckv ocē hak’n owat, mvn tohkvlkaket– Mowvtēt ont on.
if he had their respect, then they would gather– That’s sort of how it happened.

271
00:20:25,281 –> 00:20:31,179
Thomas Little tat em erkenaket ont owisen, emvhayet,
Thomas Little preached to them, but also taught them,

272
00:20:31,179 –> 00:20:35,547
mont ‘towēt ‘svyetv tat emvhayet,
and taught them how it should be run,

273
00:20:35,547 –> 00:20:39,973
Cokv-rakko oh-onvyetvn ‘mvhayakvtēs makēt on.
and he taught how to read the Bible, they say.

274
00:20:39,973 –> 00:20:43,814
Hofonē ‘sarvtētok kowvyvnk[s], vlicēcat.
I imagine it took him quite a while to do that, when he first started.

275
00:20:43,814 –> 00:20:47,750
Mvo oh-onvyakat ‘mvhayahket hvtą
So they taught them to read,

276
00:20:47,750 –> 00:20:53,800
nerē fēkvpkv lomheko monket mēkusvpkv hayet,
and at night, before they lay down to rest, they had a prayer,

277
00:20:53,800 –> 00:20:56,722
“Hvthvyvtke avpokatskateu mvo
“When you get up in the morning, also,

278
00:20:56,722 –> 00:21:02,649
matapowēn momēc’t owvkvccvs” kic’t ‘mvhayvtēt ont o[s] makēt on hēcvyvnt[s].
you should do the same,” he taught them, and I saw it [in the papers].

279
00:21:02,649 –> 00:21:07,554
“Estofis nak-omvlkv mēkusvpkv ocet,
“It’s always good to have a prayer about everything,

280
00:21:07,554 –> 00:21:13,947
cen nekēkv owat aret owvccvs” ‘stekicē owemvtok, emonkisont os, hiyowat.
about your actions and such,” they used to tell people, and maybe it is the same nowadays.

281
00:21:13,947 –> 00:21:19,847
Sulkē mowisen ē– yv ēkvnv onkv mucv oketv ofv tat,
There are a lot of them, but–in this land or at this time,

282
00:21:19,847 –> 00:21:22,431
nake pvfnē ‘yacvkēt ont onkv.
they want to do things fast.

283
00:21:22,431 –> 00:21:27,794
Mv tat ę̄ sulkē mowvkekot owvtēs kowitok.
I think a lot of them are probably not doing that [praying and such].

284
00:21:27,794 –> 00:21:33,714
Mv hvtą hompetv-hak-cuko hiyowat mocvsvkē owē hayephoyet os kicetskat,
Now there are dining halls being built, you say,

285
00:21:33,714 –> 00:21:36,898
cēmeu cenhayvkephoyemvte onkv? M-hm.
did they make one for y’all church, too? M-hm.

286
00:21:36,898 –> 00:21:40,050
Onkv mvn omvlkv mv tohkvlkatsket owv, mvn?
So do you all get together there?

287
00:21:40,050 –> 00:21:41,838
M-hm. ‘Svteloket– ‘Setohkvlket.
M-hm. Bringing it. Gathering together.

288
00:21:41,838 –> 00:21:44,707
M-hm, yv hompetv ‘setohkvlkē, mvn,
M-hm, bringing the food all together there,

289
00:21:44,707 –> 00:21:49,333
este hompvkuecet, hompet fullatsket owv? Uh-huh.
and you all feed the people and eat? Uh-huh.

290
00:21:49,333 –> 00:22:02,825
Onkv nake ētv mv ohfvccv, mēkusvpkv-cuko ohfvccv onvyetv ocetsken owan, onvyepvs.
So if you have anything else to tell about that, or about the church, go ahead and tell it.

291
00:22:02,850 –> 00:22:04,825
Owen yvhiketv?
And a song?

292
00:22:04,825 –> 00:22:08,848
Yv, mv yvhiketv sulkēn yvhikaket owemvts kiceccat,
All those songs that people used to sing, as you say,

293
00:22:08,848 –> 00:22:12,000
mvo–mvn iesenkerrvkēpetskemvte?
did you learn from them also?

294
00:22:12,000 –> 00:22:22,742
Mvt on hvtą, Okcvn-Hvccen cvckuce vtēt on mvn
My aunt was from Salt Creek [church],

295
00:22:22,742 –> 00:22:31,443
mēkusvpkv-cuko ‘shayvthokēt on, Rewahle ohkalvlk’ ‘shayvtkvkē mahēt on, mvn
they had all-night services at that church near Thlewahle Methodist church,

296
00:22:31,443 –> 00:22:34,108
Carmen Lowe kihocen ar’t owemvts.
and there was someone called Carmen Lowe there.

297
00:22:34,108 –> 00:22:39,147
Mv ehiwv ē– mv ‘tepakat cvllēckvn vtēhkvnket vhoyepēt on.
He and his wife, they would go together in a wagon.

298
00:22:39,147 –> 00:22:43,324
“Vyēpihą?” kicin, “Vye–Cakk-vyepvs” mahokvnton.
“Can I go?” I said. They told me to go ahead and go with them.

299
00:22:43,324 –> 00:22:47,611
Ahyit, mvn yakkopvnkvn okvyiskv arvyvtē cvhotusēn owat,
I went, but I just wanted to go play, and when I was tired,

300
00:22:47,611 –> 00:22:50,236
‘puetake vpvlwv hotosvkēpvcuken,
and the other kids would get tired too,

301
00:22:50,236 –> 00:22:54,814
mēkusvpkv-cuko yvhihokan mv yopvn vpokēn,
we’d go inside the church where they were singing and we would sit in the back,

302
00:22:54,814 –> 00:22:57,355
mv cukofv ētan vpokēn,
we sat in that same room,

303
00:22:57,355 –> 00:23:01,800
vccetv tis ocvkēn atakpvticvhan’t on lomhēn,
and if they had quilts, they’d spread them on the floor and we’d lay down.

304
00:23:01,800 –> 00:23:06,325
Mvn yvhihokat vtēkusen pohet nocicēpeyvtēt o[s].
All we heard was that singing, and then we went off to sleep.

305
00:23:06,325 –> 00:23:09,164
Mv ‘svpvkēn ǫha kont kerrvkot onkat,
Because of that, I don’t know, but

306
00:23:09,164 –> 00:23:18,534
en– ennvrkvpv yvhik’tv nerē omv̨lkvn cvpuse “Mēkusvpkv hayvkēts” maket,
at midnight, during the singings, my grandma would always say, “Let’s have a prayer.”

307
00:23:18,534 –> 00:23:25,742
‘puetake vtelohyen,
and she gathered all the children,

308
00:23:25,742 –> 00:23:31,659
Cokv-Rakko warke estowusis oh-onayatsken maket,
and she asked us all to read a Bible verse,

309
00:23:31,659 –> 00:23:33,925
este omv̨lkvn ohhuehkēt on.
and called on each one.

310
00:23:33,925 –> 00:23:35,607
“Naken oh-onvyepvyē tē?” kont,
“What am I going to read?”

311
00:23:35,607 –> 00:23:38,500
orēn vm vkerrickvn arvyēt owemvts. M-hm.
I would really think about that. M-hm.

312
00:23:38,512 –> 00:23:42,866
Ont on mon “Vpvkēn yvhiketvo enhopoyvccvs.
And she’d say, “Pick out a song, too.

313
00:23:42,866 –> 00:23:48,846
Enhopohyet, vlicēcetsken owat, cem vniceyvrēs” mahoken. Mvn.
If you pick one and start it, we will help you,” she said.

314
00:23:48,846 –> 00:23:53,023
Mvn ‘svlicē ‘stowē witvyvtē[s], yvhiketv.
That’s when probably I started singing.

315
00:23:53,023 –> 00:23:56,276
Hę̄ren cemvhayēpvttises, mv.
She really taught you well back then.

316
00:23:56,276 –> 00:24:02,847
Fekhvmketv ocet owvrēs cekont yvhiketv ‘svlilēceccen [‘svlicēceccen] owat, cekont okhoyvtē tis.
She wanted you to have confidence when you started a song, is what she wished for you.

317
00:24:02,847 –> 00:24:05,098
Mowis, hę̄re-mahes.
That’s all good.

318
00:24:05,098 –> 00:24:08,087
Mon mv ąret, mv uh
Then as time went on,

319
00:24:08,087 –> 00:24:10,502
mv cem pvlse erkenvkvt ont owv?
is your husband a preacher?

320
00:24:10,502 –> 00:24:14,131
mv, mv tokot mv ‘tepahkeyof,
No, he wasn’t, but when we got together,

321
00:24:14,131 –> 00:24:19,603
“Mēkusvpkv-cuko mvn vrę̄pvyētētok, vyetv cvyacētt os.
I told him, “I am used to going to church, I want to go to church.

322
00:24:19,603 –> 00:24:24,694
‘Tvcak-‘Sostv hakētt onkv, vyetv cvyac’t os” kicin.
Fourth Sunday is coming up and I want to go.”

323
00:24:24,694 –> 00:24:28,322
Vm eyacekat kērrin, mont owisen,
I knew he didnʻt want me to go,

324
00:24:28,322 –> 00:24:36,848
hvtą vhoyēkis mowen vcohmvttēpen, vnt mēkusvpkv-cuko vrę̄pvyvtētok vntvnecē hayen. Uh huh.
Sometimes we didn’t go, I missed it. I was used to going to church, I missed it. Uh-huh.

325
00:24:36,848 –> 00:24:45,480
Ont on, ąyen, mowē ‘stowisen “Vyēpvhant owis” kicin. Cvcke hvtą vcak-vyetv vlicehcin,
Time went on and I just told him, “I’m going to go.” I started going with my mom,

326
00:24:45,480 –> 00:24:51,846
ayē hak’t owemvts, ayē hak’t owen mowis, vm punayat,
and then he started going, but when he talked to me he said,

327
00:24:51,871 –> 00:24:56,507
“Cem mēkusvpkv-cuko vhvoke receyiyvkos.
“I will never go through the doors of your church.

328
00:24:56,507 –> 00:24:59,673
Cent vrepvhan’t ontskes” cvkicen,
You go ahead and go,” he told me,

329
00:24:59,673 –> 00:25:03,445
“Enka!” kihcin, vrēpin, ąyen,
“Okay!” I said, and attended, and after a long time,

330
00:25:03,445 –> 00:25:08,056
mv cvpuse okvyat mvn, em punayen,
my grandma that I mentioned, she talked to him,

331
00:25:08,056 –> 00:25:13,193
“Cepuse vm punvyę̄pet. Cvpuse mowēt owēpvtē.
“Your grandma has been talking to me. I wish my grandma was like her.

332
00:25:13,193 –> 00:25:19,124
Mv, mvt tis cvpuset owēpvtē, kont vkerricvyis” maken em punąyē monken,
I wish she were my grandma, is what I was thinking” he said as she kept talking to him.

333
00:25:19,124 –> 00:25:21,536
Oh, ar’t on–
Oh, he was there–

334
00:25:21,536 –> 00:25:27,301
uh, Woodrow Haney mv kicvyisē mvn, mv pum erkenvkvt ont on,
that Woodrow Haney that I spoke about, he was our preacher at that time.

335
00:25:27,301 –> 00:25:32,866
“‘Oh– iepupahket, pum vnicepetskē ta[ye]t owat ar’t ontskes’ cvkįcēt ont os” maken,
[My husband] said that [Woodrow] kept telling him, “Come join us and you can help us out.

336
00:25:32,866 –> 00:25:39,253
‘Yvhiketv tat ‘sem vnvckēt yvhikēpēt ont owat on.'” M-hm.
You are fortunate in being able to sing.” M-hm.

337
00:25:39,253 –> 00:25:44,131
“‘Iepupaketsken owat, hę̄ren vpēyepē ta[ye]t os’ cvkįc’t os” maken.
[My husband] said that [Woodrow] kept telling him, “If you come join us, we can go the right way.”

338
00:25:44,131 –> 00:25:47,590
Easter owēt owē witvtēs, mv.
That might have been around Easter.

339
00:25:47,590 –> 00:25:51,031
Good Friday owēn ‘svpohoken,
We had service on Good Friday,

340
00:25:51,031 –> 00:25:53,812
mvn av̨hten, mvn ohkvlhoyen,
and he finally came forward and was baptized.

341
00:25:53,812 –> 00:25:57,589
mvn Woodrow ‘mvhąyen,
Woodrow kept teaching him,

342
00:25:57,589 –> 00:26:02,656
‘svyekcusowē hahket ayen, hvtą
and he got a little stronger in his church work and continued,

343
00:26:02,656 –> 00:26:06,561
hofone-mahekan, Woodrow enkvpvkehpen. M-hm.
it wasn’t too long after that that Woodrow left it. M-hm.

344
00:26:06,561 –> 00:26:10,296
Erkenaket enwikētt vrēpen,
He had quit preaching,

345
00:26:10,296 –> 00:26:13,774
“‘Cvkicet ‘svcohyekcįcetsken vpakimvtat.
[My husband] told Woodrow, “You kept encouraging me and for that reason I joined in.

346
00:26:13,774 –> 00:26:18,532
Cent hvtą ecohyekcicvhanvyat vm orētt os’ kicvyēs” maken.
It has come time for me to encourage you,” [my husband] told him.

347
00:26:18,532 –> 00:26:25,226
Owemvtan, uh Woodrow mvt mvhayvtēt ont o[s].
That’s what happened, uh Woodrow, he taught him.

348
00:26:25,226 –> 00:26:29,285
Onkv ha– Owen ąyen erkenvkv hakēpemvte? M-hm.
And as time went on, he became a preacher? M-hm.

349
00:26:29,285 –> 00:26:34,119
Owen mowet hofonē ‘tepakvtē sehokatskē monkvt os.
So you have been together a long time and y’all are in the same standing now.

350
00:26:34,119 –> 00:26:39,412
Enhofonē nvcowat mahen ‘tepakaccet ont on mahket–maket ohketska?
How many years did you say y’all have been married?

351
00:26:39,412 –> 00:26:42,960
Uh, ohrolopē palē-ēpaken hokkolohkaken.
Sixty-two years.

352
00:26:42,960 –> 00:26:45,800
Oowee, hofone-mahēt.
A very long time.

353
00:26:45,800 –> 00:26:48,976
Mowē ‘stowe-sekot os,
There’s nothing wrong with that,

354
00:26:48,976 –> 00:26:53,378
vnokeckv tat eterakkuecet etem ocet owatskat.
for you all to have love and respect toward one another,

355
00:26:53,378 –> 00:26:56,656
Pvlkēs [meant to say tvlkēs]. Hofonetok.
for sure. That’s a long time.

356
00:26:56,656 –> 00:27:03,377
Este-hvtke tat “Estowē mowvtēken ‘tepakatskvt tē, ‘tennaorekot?” maken
The white people ask, “How did you all stay together that long without getting on each other’s nerves?”

357
00:27:03,377 –> 00:27:05,776
‘Tennaorekot
We may have gotten on each another’s nerves,

358
00:27:05,776 –> 00:27:13,846
kvpvkēn ētvn ‘sten–nake–‘stenaoricekot avrēpvken, ‘stehorēt owemvts kicin okaket ont o[s].
but when we had issues that bothered us, we would just give each other space and you soon forget.

359
00:27:13,846 –> 00:27:16,773
Mowēt owēs. M-hm.
That’s how it is. M-hm.

360
00:27:16,773 –> 00:27:22,000
Onkv mvn hę̄re-mahes, mvo, ‘punvkv pum onayetskes.
You have told us a good thing.

361
00:27:22,000 –> 00:27:28,685
Hvtvm nak ētvn ‘tem opunvyēcvkvrēs.
We will talk about something else.

362
00:27:28,685 –> 00:27:32,798

363
00:27:32,798 –> 00:27:38,006
Hvtvm hiyowat mv uh cem pvlse nak hocefkvt owa?
And now, what is your husband’s name?

364
00:27:38,006 –> 00:27:38,707
Walter.
Walter.

365
00:27:38,707 –> 00:27:40,585
Oh. Walter McGirt.
Oh. Walter McGirt.

366
00:27:40,585 –> 00:27:46,888
Kērris. Este vcvkus’ owēt, tor-sakkakv ‘sakkayet. M-hm. M-hm, arēt owēs.
I know him. Little short man, wears glasses. M-hm. M-hm, he’s seen around.

367
00:27:46,888 –> 00:27:51,156
Kērris. Ella Coon en-brother? M-hm. Oh, “en-brother”.
I know him. Ella Coon’s brother? M-hm. Oh, “en-brother”.

368
00:27:51,156 –> 00:27:55,035
Ervhv? Ecuse? Ervhv?
Older sister? Younger sister?

369
00:27:55,035 –> 00:27:59,596
Ella Coon mvt erv– ēwvnwv?
Ella Coon is his– his sister?

370
00:27:59,596 –> 00:28:01,283
Ella Coon-t ēwvnwvt ont on.
Ella Coon is his sister.

371
00:28:01,283 –> 00:28:04,354
Oh, cvhǫsēt owēs mv mowē maketv.
Oh, I always forget how to say that.

372
00:28:04,354 –> 00:28:07,290
Uh-huh, kērris.
Uh-huh, I know him.

373
00:28:07,290 –> 00:28:12,715
Onkv mv, hofonē ‘tepvkaccvtēt onkv, hokkolaccat mvn,
So then, since you both have been together a long time, the two of you,

374
00:28:12,715 –> 00:28:19,555
opunvkv Semvnole hvtą este Maskoke em punvkv ‘punahoyatskēt owētok,
and you both speak the Seminole or Muskogee language,

375
00:28:19,555 –> 00:28:21,370
onkv etem punahoyet,
talking to each other,

376
00:28:21,370 –> 00:28:25,780
em punvkv etemvrahkusēt owv, estowusat?
does he speak a little different?

377
00:28:25,780 –> 00:28:31,954
Um, mowēt on o mvtisen. ‘Punayin pǫhat tis ont os.
A little bit. I guess from hearing me talking all the time,

378
00:28:31,954 –> 00:28:34,875
enlvpotkus owē hakēt on.
he’s got it all straightened out now.

379
00:28:34,875 –> 00:28:41,953
Mowis nak vnvcowēt makat, enkerrēskon makēt on.
But there are a few words that he says sometimes that I can’t figure out what he’s saying.

380
00:28:41,953 –> 00:28:46,092
“Rehsit”, nak,
Like “rehsit” (‘I’m going to go get it’).

381
00:28:46,092 –> 00:28:47,932
uh,

382
00:28:47,932 –> 00:28:49,253

383
00:28:49,253 –> 00:28:54,515
‘Tvn hopvyēn likin, resvhanvkat, “rehsit” kicvkēt ont owisen,
Iʻll be sitting kind of far off and to go get something, I’ll say “rehsit”,

384
00:28:54,515 –> 00:28:58,882
ent, mv tat, “sehsit” makēt owēs.
but him, he says “sehsit”.

385
00:28:58,882 –> 00:29:04,894
Mowis mv naken okat kērrvkkv.
But we know what he is talking about.

386
00:29:04,894 –> 00:29:09,500
Vnt “fish head” mak’t okces kowvyis!
I thought you said “fish head”!

387
00:29:09,500 –> 00:29:14,141
“Rehsit” makēt on. Uh-huh. “Sehsit.” Uh-huh.
“Rehsit” I say. Uh-huh. “Sehsit.” Uh-huh.

388
00:29:14,141 –> 00:29:21,065
“Resehsit”. Uh-huh. What is that? ‘Towēn naken mak’t okv? Hvtusvnkē maken.
“Resehsit”. Uh-huh. What is that? What is he saying? He said that recently.

389
00:29:21,065 –> 00:29:24,972
Wikvt-sekot onko mont vkerricit.
I wonder why he’s never quit.

390
00:29:24,972 –> 00:29:28,093
Onkv ‘punvkv mowē ‘svrę̄pet
Well, he’s been talking his own way

391
00:29:28,093 –> 00:29:32,173
cenake min ‘punvyēcicē haketskemvte?
so you finally got him to talk your way?

392
00:29:32,173 –> 00:29:34,920
‘Stowusat.
Just a little bit.

393
00:29:34,920 –> 00:29:37,182

394
00:29:37,182 –> 00:29:40,452
Mowē makaket on vpelicetvt,
That’s the way they say things, and we laugh,

395
00:29:40,452 –> 00:29:44,634
hvtą “rehsit” makat hvtą hopįyē tis okak kowvyin,
like when you said “rehsit”, you would think it was far off, but

396
00:29:44,634 –> 00:29:48,205
hopvye-mahekot owan oken.
he means it’s not that far off.

397
00:29:48,205 –> 00:29:50,618
Enkērresko owis owakēt owvnkes.
Sometimes you don’t understand what they are meaning.

398
00:29:50,618 –> 00:29:53,936
Mv mowē ‘te-cate vpvkakē tat
There’s some Indians, and when we’re together

399
00:29:53,936 –> 00:29:58,836
mv nak-onvkuce mahǫkisē mv ‘punvyakat,
those that tell little stories in the language,

400
00:29:58,836 –> 00:30:02,666
hopvyēn hofonvnkēn on owat,
if they’re talking about long ago,

401
00:30:02,666 –> 00:30:04,999
“hofone-mahekovnkē” makaket,
they say “hofone-mahekovnkē” ‘not long ago’,

402
00:30:04,999 –> 00:30:11,133
hvtą ‘towusat hofonusēn owak’n owat, “hofonvnkēn” makaket,
but if it’s something just recent, they say “hofonvnkēn” ‘long ago’.

403
00:30:11,133 –> 00:30:16,393
mowis, hofone-mahēn okak’n owat “hofǫnvnkē” makakēt owēs, maket.
But then when they are talking about things long ago they say “hofǫnvnkē” ‘loooong ago’.

404
00:30:16,393 –> 00:30:20,694
Mowēn enkerrvkēt owēs makaket.
That’s how we understand them, the way they talk.

405
00:30:20,694 –> 00:30:26,683
Mv em punvkvt enhakē ‘mvrahkvt oket “hofonvnkē” mak’n owat.
The sound of their word is different if they say ‘long ago’.

406
00:30:26,683 –> 00:30:32,270
hofone-mahēn okēt ont os kicēt.
It means ‘long ago’, we say.

407
00:30:32,297 –> 00:30:38,998
Mowēt o[s]. Hvtą mv opunvkv–Hvtą ‘sokkoskv makakat tv, mv tv?
That’s the way it is. And about the language–What about when they say ‘soap’, how about that?

408
00:30:38,998 –> 00:30:42,435
‘Sokkoskv mv–I mean, este Maskoket owēpikv,
For ‘soap’–I mean, I’m Muskogee,

409
00:30:42,435 –> 00:30:47,053
mv Eufaula fvccv vtvyēt onkv, “kvpe” makvyēt owē[s], “kvpe”.
I come from toward Eufaula, so I say “kvpe”.

410
00:30:47,053 –> 00:30:51,349
M-hm. You know, ‘sēhvsetec–tolofv tis ‘sokkoset mahǫkvtē[s].
M-hm. You know, cleaning yourself– or what they always say for washing your face with.

411
00:30:51,349 –> 00:30:59,447
Owat mvn yv fvccv Semvnolvlke em etvlwv vlahkvyof,
When I came this way to the Seminole Nation,

412
00:30:59,447 –> 00:31:05,223
“kvpe” makin, kvpe-cvfke min asvm eshoyemvts.
I’d say “kvpe”, and they’d get sofkee lye for me instead.

413
00:31:05,223 –> 00:31:12,578
Kerrvkekot onko? kont vkerricvyemvtis, mowis, hiyowat kērris. M-hm. ‘Temvrahrvkvt.
“Don’t they know anything?” I thought, but now I know. M-hm. [Their speaking] is different.

414
00:31:12,578 –> 00:31:16,500
‘Sestvwoskekot ont owat. Uh-huh.
When you’re not used to it. Uh-huh.

415
00:31:16,500 –> 00:31:18,721
Kērrvkekot ont os, opunvkv kowvkēt owē[s].
You think they don’t know the language, is what we think.

416
00:31:18,721 –> 00:31:21,724
Mv halo pvlaknuce ocat mvt,
The wash pan,

417
00:31:21,724 –> 00:31:29,289
owv vcahnē ‘sēokkosvkat mvt, ‘sēokkoskvn mvn kicēt owemvts. Uh-huh.
the kind you pour water in and wash yourself with, we call it a wash pan (‘sēokkoskv). Uh-huh.

418
00:31:29,289 –> 00:31:36,377
Pomeu, “Mv sēokkoskvn uh avnwiyvs” ‘stekicēt owēt, mvo.
Us, too. “Hand me that wash pan (‘sēokkoskv)” we’d ask people.

419
00:31:36,377 –> 00:31:42,096
Mon mv tolofv ‘sēkvrpēckv owē, mv cutkusat, mv tv, naken?
And to dry your face with, that little one, what about that?

420
00:31:42,096 –> 00:31:43,428
‘Sēokkoskuce.
Washrag (‘sēokkoskuce).

421
00:31:43,428 –> 00:31:46,608
Uh-huh, ‘sēhvsvtēckv owat mv hvtvm makat.
Uh-huh, or napkin (‘sēhvsvtēckv).

422
00:31:46,608 –> 00:31:52,412
Mowēs kowvyēs. Mon mv hvtą cufunwv tv?
I think that’s right. And what about a fork (cufunwv)?

423
00:31:52,412 –> 00:31:57,125
Eshompetv. Uh-huh. Cufunwv mvt punt.
To eat with. Uh-huh. “Cufunwv”, that’s us.

424
00:31:57,125 –> 00:32:01,292
Punt mv nak ‘svhoretvn okēt owēs.
For us it also means something to sew with.

425
00:32:01,292 –> 00:32:04,139
Vneu mvn makvyēt owemvts, cufunwv.
Me, too, I say that, cufunwv.

426
00:32:04,139 –> 00:32:08,187
Cvpuse mvn, cufunwuce makēt on, cufunwv.
My grandma said cufunwuce and cufunwv.

427
00:32:08,187 –> 00:32:10,265
Hvtą esropottv tis makat,
And they called it “esropottv”, too,

428
00:32:10,265 –> 00:32:14,642
vculvke mahat mvn makakvtēt ont os kowvyēt o[s]. M-hm.
the very oldest ones used to say that, I think. M-hm.

429
00:32:14,660 –> 00:32:20,440
Mon, cvcke mv vpelkv-hayv owusēt owēmvtok. M-hm.
My mom liked to tell jokes. M-hm.

430
00:32:20,440 –> 00:32:26,293
Nak mv ‘punvyepeko ‘monahok’n owat, ‘sropottv kihocof,
She didn’t speak like that, so when they would tell her “‘sropottv”,

431
00:32:26,293 –> 00:32:28,447
mv atvme ‘saren,
it’s like driving a car,

432
00:32:28,447 –> 00:32:34,362
kulkē catēpē ‘sropottan okhoyet makēt owemvt[s], mv tat.
when the light turns red, it’s like driving through it, she would say.

433
00:32:34,362 –> 00:32:38,666
M-hm, mowakēt os.
M-hm, that’s what they do.

434
00:32:38,666 –> 00:32:46,936
Ohwen hvtvm mv cen– uh, cenhoktalat tv? oceccēt owemvte? Cempvlse ecke?
And again your–did you have a mother-in-law? Your husband’s mom?

435
00:32:46,936 –> 00:32:50,151
Mvn kicvkēt ont owv, ‘stenhoktalat kicet?
Is that what we call them, “mother-in-law”?

436
00:32:50,151 –> 00:32:52,775
“Old lady” kicēt owē[s].
We called them “old lady”.

437
00:32:52,775 –> 00:32:58,000
Mother-in-law, old lady kicē owēt okhoyvnte, vnhoktalat?
Did we used to call a mother-in-law “old lady”, my old lady?

438
00:32:58,000 –> 00:33:03,210
Ehocefkat mvn hocēfimvts. Liza hocefkvt on.
I called her by her name instead. Her name was Liza.

439
00:33:03,210 –> 00:33:06,999
Mvt estonkon, uh, nake tē?
That’s fine, what is it?

440
00:33:06,999 –> 00:33:12,050
Cem ahę̄rusēt ont, cem vnicę̄pen aretskēt owemvte? M-hm.
Was she good to you, did she help you out with things you needed? M-hm.

441
00:33:12,050 –> 00:33:14,805
Ēyąskusēt on. M-hm.
She was really humble. M-hm.

442
00:33:14,805 –> 00:33:16,888
Vhę̄ricusēn ‘punayēt on.
She talked real soft.

443
00:33:16,888 –> 00:33:20,711
Vpę̄lusē ‘svwoskēt ąrēt owemvt[s].
She always had a smile.

444
00:33:20,711 –> 00:33:26,000
Tvlako mvo, asohlicē ‘svwǫskēt ont.
Beans, too, she always had a pot on.

445
00:33:26,000 –> 00:33:30,454
Este restem oricat, hompicet.
When people came to visit, she would feed them.

446
00:33:30,454 –> 00:33:34,816
Nak takuecepēt ont, hompicet, arēt owemvts.
She would have something prepared, and feed them.

447
00:33:34,816 –> 00:33:41,266
Mon hvtvm, vsehkv kihocē, nak, nak sųlkē,
And then, they had lots of rules,

448
00:33:41,266 –> 00:33:47,683
uh hoktē tis, hopuewuce ocepvhanet arat,
if a woman was going to have a baby,

449
00:33:47,683 –> 00:33:52,187
vsehkv sųlkēn nak mowekot owvhaneccēs.
there were a lot of things you weren’t supposed to do.

450
00:33:52,187 –> 00:33:55,827
“Ēvkvtēcet” pukicet, pum onahǫyvtē[s].
“Be careful,” they’d always tell us.

451
00:33:55,844 –> 00:33:59,948
Centv, estowusat mv mahǫkvtē kērretskv?
How about you, do you remember what they always used to say?

452
00:33:59,948 –> 00:34:05,454
Kerrvyēt owemvtis, omvlkvn cvhosētis ont.
I used to know, but it seems like I forgot them all.

453
00:34:05,454 –> 00:34:09,277
Vkerricvko ta[ye]t ohwis, mv hv̨nkusen vkerricvyis.
I couldn’t think of any, but then I was just thinking of one.

454
00:34:09,277 –> 00:34:15,218
“Vtakhvkēn topv ohwakketvn monkot on owatskēt ont os” mahoken.
“Don’t lay sideways across the bed,” they said.

455
00:34:15,218 –> 00:34:18,143
Nak ‘ston okhoye tē kowvyē[s], mv tan?
Why do they say that, I wonder?

456
00:34:18,143 –> 00:34:26,555
‘Tit okemvts kowvk’ ont, vm onayemvts.
I’ve forgotten who it was who told me.

457
00:34:26,555 –> 00:34:31,694
Mvn naken ‘stowēt ont on okvtē tē?
How come they would say that to you?

458
00:34:31,694 –> 00:34:37,391
Estuce vtakhvkē hakēt’n owat, ohceccekot mak’t om.
If the baby turns sideways, you might not be able to have it.

459
00:34:37,391 –> 00:34:42,358
M-hm, mv, naken kic’t okhoyēt owa, mv?
M-hm, what do they call that?

460
00:34:42,358 –> 00:34:49,726
Ele hvnket–nake te?–monko tayē kicē okhoyemvte? M-hm. Ele hvnkusos.
One leg, what is it called, it was turned sideways, they said. M-hm. Just one leg.

461
00:34:49,726 –> 00:34:53,714
“Breech”, kic’t, in English, kowvyē[s]. Mowēn ok. Mowē tayes mak[es].
“Breech”, it’s called in English, I think. That’s what she means.

462
00:34:53,714 –> 00:34:57,334
Ele tat yoshoyen.
The feet come out first.

463
00:34:57,334 –> 00:34:58,390

464
00:34:58,390 –> 00:35:03,810
Mowen hvtą vnet mv eto, I mean, “eto” kicit,
And for myself, tree, I mean, “tree”, I said,

465
00:35:03,810 –> 00:35:07,022
vhvoke tekropottetv mv tempe
when you stand in the doorway,

466
00:35:07,022 –> 00:35:11,037
uh eto, I mean, “eto”:
uh eto, I mean, “tree”:

467
00:35:11,037 –> 00:35:15,535
“Vhvoke takhuerekot owvccvs” ‘stekihǫcēt owemvts. M-hm.
“Don’t stand in the doorway,” they always used to tell people. M-hm.

468
00:35:15,535 –> 00:35:19,875
“Estuce ocvhanvk[e]n owat, mv ‘stenyekcēt owēs” maket,
“If you are going to have a baby, it will be hard for you,” they would say,

469
00:35:19,906 –> 00:35:21,871
mvo onahǫyēt owemvts.
they always used to say that.

470
00:35:21,871 –> 00:35:22,980
Mv tv, pohetskvtēt owv?
Have you heard that?

471
00:35:22,980 –> 00:35:27,977
Hun-uh. Mv pohvkot owvtē tan, okhoyen ohkis.
Hun-uh. I never have heard that, but it was mentioned, I mean.

472
00:35:27,977 –> 00:35:33,233
Onkv ‘mvtēkusen mv ohfvccvn owat kērretskv?
So is that all you know about that?

473
00:35:33,233 –> 00:35:37,156
‘Mvtēkust os kowis mv rorēpin owat kērrē wit arētisen.
That’s all I can think of, but when the time comes, I might think of something.

474
00:35:37,156 –> 00:35:43,060
Uh-huh. Mowis mv nak mowakat pomeu vkerric’tv puyacekot onkv, hiyowat kiceccat.
Uh-huh. Well, we don’t want to think about those things nowadays like what you have said [about having babies].

475
00:35:43,060 –> 00:35:49,195
Hopuetake ocē vpēyvtē ‘towusekon ‘puetak oc’t owētisen,
When we had our children, we didnʻt have a problem, everything went all right.

476
00:35:49,195 –> 00:35:53,500
vkerric’tv puyacekot owēs.
We don’t want to think about it.

477
00:35:53,500 –> 00:35:58,340
Owen hiyowat mv, uh mēkusvpkv owvkē mv
And now, prayers and such,

478
00:35:58,340 –> 00:36:01,600
you know hompetv tis takuehohcen,
you know, when they’ve prepared the food,

479
00:36:01,600 –> 00:36:04,171
“Punhompepvks” cekihocisen owat,
and then in case they ask you to eat,

480
00:36:04,171 –> 00:36:07,293
hv̨nkvtēken ‘stohhuehohken,
they’ll call on one of you,

481
00:36:07,293 –> 00:36:09,650
“Mēkusvpkv punhayvs” mahokvtēs.
and they’d ask us, “Say grace for us.”

482
00:36:09,650 –> 00:36:15,578
Mv tv, ‘sēmvhayet owat maketskēt tayv?
How about that, can you say one to practice by?

483
00:36:15,578 –> 00:36:18,540
you know hompetv,
You know the food,

484
00:36:18,540 –> 00:36:20,810
ohheromketv kic’t okhoyēt owv?
to say the blessing for it?

485
00:36:20,810 –> 00:36:30,387
onkat ohheromket hompetv ‘tenheromket ohoyekv mēkusvpkv ‘stenhayetv,
they’re giving us the food to eat, so we make a prayer for people to bless it,

486
00:36:30,387 –> 00:36:32,444
mowet hayetv kērretskv?
do you know how to do that?

487
00:36:32,444 –> 00:36:33,551

488
00:36:33,551 –> 00:36:35,470
‘Stowusat kērris.
I know a little bit.

489
00:36:35,470 –> 00:36:39,953
Mv ‘te-hvtke em punvkv tv̨lkusen hiyowat ‘punahoyēpēkv,
We only speak English now [at church],

490
00:36:39,953 –> 00:36:42,909
svmon mon mahvkot owē[s].
so I don’t hardly do that.

491
00:36:42,909 –> 00:36:47,958
Onkv mv maketv maketskē tayv?
So can you say the prayer?

492
00:36:47,958 –> 00:36:50,919
Mak’tv kowvyēs. Uh-huh.
I can try. Uh-huh.

493
00:36:50,919 –> 00:36:56,438
Hesaketvmesē mucv-nettv fvccv-likat,
Our Father, at this noon hour today,

494
00:36:56,438 –> 00:36:59,160
etohkaletskat, mvto cekicēt,
we thank you for bringing us together,

495
00:36:59,160 –> 00:37:02,749
momen hompetvn ‘tenhompvhanē
now the food that we are going to eat together,

496
00:37:02,749 –> 00:37:05,826
vpokeyof, epupaket,
while we are here, be with us,

497
00:37:05,826 –> 00:37:09,566
momet takuecakē fullateu mvo vpokaket,
and those who prepared the food, too, are here,

498
00:37:09,566 –> 00:37:13,289
omv̨lkeyan epupaket, epohmērket,
be with us all and have mercy on us,

499
00:37:13,289 –> 00:37:17,905
naken tayeko momēcēt fulleyvt momē estowis,
even if we have done wrong,

500
00:37:17,905 –> 00:37:21,850
Hesaketvmesē, cent pum mērret omvlkv ‘spunwiket
God, bless us and forgive us all,

501
00:37:21,850 –> 00:37:25,941
Hiyowat mēkusvpkv-cukon fullēkv,
Now, while we are here at the church,

502
00:37:25,941 –> 00:37:31,249
hiyowat hompetv hompet, ‘tenhompeyof,
now we are going to eat the food, and when we share it together,

503
00:37:31,249 –> 00:37:33,571
omvlkvn ‘spuyekcvkuecet,
make us all strong,

504
00:37:33,571 –> 00:37:37,543
epohmerrvs kont cen pohēpēt os,
and bless us, we ask,

505
00:37:37,543 –> 00:37:40,268
cehocefkv vcacvkē tuccēnat omv̨lkvn,
in all three of your holy names,

506
00:37:40,268 –> 00:37:41,274
Amen.
Amen.

507
00:37:41,274 –> 00:37:43,508
M-hm, hę̄re-mahes, mv.
M-hm, that was very good,

508
00:37:43,508 –> 00:37:49,548
Mowēt uh, mv, mv ohfvccv opunvyehcet hvtą,
Regarding that you talked about,

509
00:37:49,548 –> 00:37:53,089
uh Hesaketvmesē onkat Ohfvnkv vrakkuehcet,
you gave honor to God or the One Above,

510
00:37:53,089 –> 00:37:56,584
mowē ‘punayetskat, mowē ąyet,
that’s how you say it and as you continue,

511
00:37:56,584 –> 00:37:58,119
respokēt ont on,
and end with it,

512
00:37:58,119 –> 00:38:00,867
mvt tąyusen mowet pǫhvyet owes.
that’s exactly how I always hear it.

513
00:38:00,867 –> 00:38:04,128
Onkv vpvltake apohicaket,
So when the others hear it,

514
00:38:04,128 –> 00:38:09,660
on owat mvo ēmeu mēkusvpkv kerrvkē tayēt owēs kowis.
they, too, can learn how to say the prayer themselves, I think.

515
00:38:09,660 –> 00:38:14,237
Onkv mvn ‘mvtēkus owen vpohkv pukic’t okhoyet owisen,
So that’s about all that we were asked to discuss today,

516
00:38:14,237 –> 00:38:18,905
hvtą estowusat hvnkē mv opunvkv
and again

517
00:38:18,905 –> 00:38:22,172
uh Hill kicē
uh Hill we say,

518
00:38:22,172 –> 00:38:27,458
opunvkv sulkēn ‘scvwepihocvtē mvo ohfvccv mv hvtvm ‘tem opunvyēcvhanēt os.
many of his stories were recorded, and we are going to talk about him.

519
00:38:27,458 –> 00:38:28,759
Nak estowa?
What is it?

520
00:38:28,759 –> 00:38:38,758
James Hill? opunvkv ocētt, mv ‘setetakuecatskvtē, owē witē.
James Hill? they have stories that you all prepared, maybe.

521
00:38:38,758 –> 00:38:53,451

522
00:38:53,451 –> 00:38:54,473

523
00:38:54,473 –> 00:39:01,163

524
00:39:01,163 –> 00:39:06,095

525
00:39:06,095 –> 00:39:14,600

526
00:39:14,600 –> 00:39:19,676

527
00:39:19,676 –> 00:39:27,887

528
00:39:27,887 –> 00:39:36,832