Linda Bear: Family, Butchering, Lullaby


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Hopuetakuce mvt ohrolopē onkat em vculkv ēpakat mahē tis oricaket,
When kids reach the year, or age, of about six,

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hvtą, em vculkv oricet mahusekis ont owat,
or they might not have reached that age,

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enhvteceskv nute–nute homv–encvokēt owēs.
their first teeth–their front teeth–come out.

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Mv em oketv oren owat hvnket nute em ēsken owat, cvcket okat,
When that time comes, if one tooth comes out, my mother would say,

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onkat cvpuse mvo, “Cem ēsket onkv, cuko oh-onvpv oh-vwikvs ce!” hvmmahket maket owemvts.
or my grandma, too, “Since your tooth has come out, throw it on top of the house!” she told us.

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“Eccaswv nute palv!” mahket, nute hvmmehcet, cuko onvpv hvmmehcet [s]oh-vfvllēt owemvts.
“Beaver teeth borrower!” we would say and throw the tooth like this on top of the house.

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“Mowvs!” pukicen, mēcēt owemvts. “Eccas nute palv” makat mvn.
“Do it!” she would tell us, and we did it. “Beaver teeth borrower!” we would say that.

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Eccaswv mv nuten punpalēt ont on okt os kont kerrvkot owemvts. Onkat, eccaswv nute palen, ocēt ont ont oka? kont kerrvkot owemvts.
I didn’t know if it meant that the beaver had let us borrow the teeth, or if it meant that the beaver had ten teeth.

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Owis mvn makēt, makēt, omv̨lkeyat mv hopuetake
But that’s what all of us children would say,

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cvcertake, hvtą cvrvhvlke, cvcusvlkuce hokkolat mvo omv̨lkeyat mowen mēcēt owemvts.
my brothers and my older sisters and my two little sisters, all of us, that’s how we would do it.

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Nute ‘soh-vfvllet, “Eccas nute pala!” mahket. ’Mvtēkus.
Throw the tooth onto it and say, “Beaver teeth borrower!” That’s it.

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Hvtą nak ētv, cvrke oce-mahēt owemvts, sukhvn ocēt ont, hvtą tolose mvo.
And my father had a lot of other things, he had pigs and also chickens.

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Cvrket mvn Chilocco mvhakv cuko mvn mvnę̄ttusēt ayvtēt owēs.
My dad went to Chilocco School when he was very young.

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Em vculkv palen hvmken tuccenohkaken oricet mv cokv-heckv vtothoyvtēt owēs.
When he reached the age of thirteen, he was sent off to school.

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Chilocco, Kansas tempe, owen mvn ąret respoyvtēt owēs.
Chilocco, near Kansas, that’s where he attended and graduated.

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Mowen mv mvhahoyat, “Cvto tohlicv mvn kerretv kerrimvts” makēt owemvts.
And that’s where he was taught and he told us he learned masonry there.

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Ohwen hvtą, cuko hayetv, hvtą cuko ’to-fokv eshayet onkat cuko essiyet owemvts.
And carpentry, building houses out of lumber, and painting them.

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Owen hvtvm mv sukhv elēckvt on hvtą tolose mvo pvsatē vcayēcē vretv mowē mvo kērrvtēt ont owemvts.
and he learned how to butcher hogs and chickens, too, to preserve them for food.

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Ohwen pomen mvn hopuetake sulkēt owēpekv, hoktvlēcakaten mvt ‘svm vculicvkēt owēpēmvtok, mvn.
Because there were a lot of us children, the older sisters were much older than me.

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Mv tat tolos ’lēckv–nake te?–’senhoyvnvkēpet on, mv tat.
That chicken killing–what is it?–they were further along in it.

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Orēn tolos em vpeswv owat etewaretvn mvn kerrvkēpet owemvts.
They had already learned how to cut up the chicken meat.

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Ele-hvfe ’tewaret, hvtą era mvo waret, sakpv mvo etewaret, nokwv mvo
Cutting up the thighs, the back, the wings, and the neck, too,

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mvt mowē kerrvkēt owemvts.
they knew how to do that.

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Vnhvte, hvte paluson art owē witvtēs.
I might have just been ten.

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Mowen cvpuset on mama ’tepakat, “Centat hvte ’slafkv owat celaccekot tayēt os. Tolose wareccekot tayēt os.
And my grandma and Momma both said, “You can’t handle a knife yet. You can’t cut up the chicken yet.

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Centat hiyowat tolose ’lēcetvn mvn ’svlicēcvhant oncces” cvkicaken,
Now you are going start killing chickens,” they told me,

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mvn cvpuse mvo mvn makēpekv, ’tǫhkotok.
And since my grandma said it, I didn’t have a choice.

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Fettvn cvrket arekv, mowē cvkict ǫhos kihcin,
My father was outside, so I told him what I was told to do,

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ohwen mv tolose mvn–nake te?–tolos hute mvn vtēhkēt owemvts.
and those chickens–what is it?–they were in the chicken pen.

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Vce tvlkusēn mvn hompicēt owen, mv pvsvtvhaneyat. Tvcak hokkolen vtēhkēt owemvts.
We only fed corn to the ones we were going to kill. They were in there for two weeks.

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Vce vtę̄kusēn hompvkuecen mvn, ena ofv hvsvthvkvrēs pukihocen,
They fed them only corn to clean out their insides, they said,

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mowen mēcēt owemvts, estofis.
that’s what we always did.

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Ohwen mvn “Hvmken raesvs!” cvkihohcen,
They told me to go get one.

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Ohwen at owvyan,
And as I was going,

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ele–tolose ele lekvclewē owēt on, celayetv cvyacekot on.
the feet– chicken feet are dirty and I didn’t want to touch them.

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Cvrke mvn “O-we cvyaceks” kicit, “Cvyacekot os. Vntat celayetv cvyaceks,” hvmmēcin,
I told my father, “O-we, I don’t like it. I don’t like it. I don’t want to touch them,” doing like this,

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Cvrket “Hilv!” mahket, avmehsen, ohwen “Hokvs. Nokfiyvs!” kihcen, cvkihcen,
My father said ‘Darn it!’ and took it from me. “Now, wring its neck,” he told me,

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“Nokfiht” tolos hvmmēct ehsin,
“Wring its neck!” and I took the chicken like this,

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“Hiyowēt nokwv enhvlahtet hvmmēcet, tolose.” “Waahhmmp, wahhmmpp” makt sakpvt ont owēpen, hiyowēn.
“Hold the chicken’s neck like this.” The wings were going “Waahhmmp, wahhmmpp” (flapping) like this.

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“Hilv!” cvrke “Tayekon mēc’t oncces” mahket, “Hvmmēcēt owvs” mahket,
“Gosh darn it!” my father said, “You’re doing it wrong.” He said “Do it like this.”

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hvmmēct tolos nokwv enhvlahtet hvmmēct tak-vwihket tolos hiyon tak-aret owemvts.
He grabbed the chicken’s neck like this and threw it on the ground and it was going around like this.

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Ohwen mvn elehpen, ohwen,
When the chicken died,

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cvcusvlket mvt hokkolet onkv, mvt owa morecvkēt ohwvtet mvn aktehhet, tafvn mvn enlēmēmvts.
I had two younger sisters, so they had boiled the water and put the chicken in, and we plucked its feathers.

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Mvn enlēmeyofvn, cvrvhv hvmket ’svm vcolusat vcvwihēkat
While we were plucking it, my next older sister

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’svm vcolat, ’svm vcolusat mvt lēmet mvo aepum vnicet owemvts.
the one just older than me, was helping us pluck the feathers, too.

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Ohwen mvn lēmet poyeyof, hvtą eckohpet, ekissuce lopǫckusēt vhvpokēt [ow]ēs. Mv tafv sepeko, mvn nokrihcet, ’stǫwusat nokrihcet ohwen.
After we finished plucking it, we singed it to get rid of the fine hair on it. Now that there were no feathers, we burned it, we burned it a little bit.

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Mowofvn
And then

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vn-sister– I mean- cvrvhv hoktvlēcv Hokte Fvske, mvn “Heyahhh! Warepvs!” kihcet aēmēt owemvts. Mvt ’tewarwict hvmmēct, tolose.
my sister, I mean, my older sister Hokte Fvske, we’d tell her “Here! Cut it up!” and give it to her. She was cutting up the chicken like this.

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’Tewarwicēt owen, owen Mamvt mvt ’sakmorēct owemvts.
While she was cutting, Momma would be frying.

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Hockvtē vpayet on mehcet, okcvnwv, homuce ’tepaket vpahyet, ’sakmorehcen orēn sulkēn norihcēt owēn
She added the flour, salt, and pepper together, she really fried and cooked a lot.

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Orēn pusulkētok, “Tolose!” mahket hę̄rat hompēpēt owemvts.
There were a lot of us, so we’d say “Chicken!” and we really ate.

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Hompetv hervhanet hompēmvts.
The food was sure good to eat.

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’Mvtēkus.
That’s all.

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Mv, puncuko-hvmēcvlke mvo, pomeu
Our family,

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homēcvlke!–puncuko-hvmēcvlke
[accidentally says ‘they’re mad at each other’]–our family,

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’tenhomecvkēt owemvts, sometimes!
they were mad at each other, too, sometimes!

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vncuko-hvmēcvlke mvn sulkēt owēkv, cvpuset ’tofv tis puncukopericēt owemvts.
There were a lot in my household, so my grandma would sometimes visit us

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Mvo mahen owe mvt cvpuse mvt, cvcke ecket owemvts.
My grandma was my mother’s mother.

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Ohwen “Cvcke ’mapohict owaks!” pukicet, ’sepohyekcicēt on.
And she told us, “Mind your mother!” and would encourage us,

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hopuetake lopicēt apohicvkēt owēt ’puculakt owemvts.
so us kids grew up kind of nice and behaved.

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Mvn mama ’mapohicekon owat, pupuset orēn pum vsēhēt owemvts.
And if we didn’t mind mama, our grandma would really scold us.

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“Tayeko mont owacces” pukicet,
“You all aren’t doing right”, she’d tell us,

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Ohwen, “Vtotketv mvo hoktvket owaccat cem ocvkēt ont os,
“You girls have duties to do,

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cuko ofv vnicet. Cecke avrvhanekot [ow]ētok” maket,
help with the house. Your mother will not always be here,” she said,

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“Pvlaknv okkoskv tis ’mvnicet, hompetv hayetv mvo kērret owet owvhanaccēs” pukicēt ont on.
“Help wash the dishes, know how to prepare food, too,” she told us.

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Onkv mvn, hoktvlēcakat mvn tuccēnet onkv, hoktvke.
There were three older girls.

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Mv hoktvlēcaten mvt mv tat entvlkusēt nak omv̨lkvn kerrepēt owemvts,
The oldest girl, she was the only one who would know how to do everything,

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tolose tis waret, onkat vpeswv–sukhv ’peswv tis rawaret.
cutting up chicken or meats, or going [to the smokehouse] to slice off some pork.

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Hvtą hockvtē mvo hopoyet, nak omvlkv ’stowēcē hompetv vpvkv, em vpakv racawet, mv tat mēcēt owemvts.
She was also the one who would look for the flour and knew how to use the other ingredients, and she could do that.

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Mvn hoktvlēcepētok kerrepēt ot.
Since she was the oldest one, she knew that.

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Owen mv hvnke vwihēkat mvt Hokte Rakko hocefkvt owemvts.
And the one next to her was named Hokte Rakko (Big Girl).

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Mvt ’stowusat nak taklik-cvmpv onkat
She would make cake or

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‘sem vtēhkēt owat monkat cvstvlē owat mvt warwicet hvtą vhv-celēhe mvo
pie or cut up watermelon, or the potatoes too,

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hvsvthicet etewarwicet mowakat mvn avnicat mvo noricet owemvts.
she would clean them and cut them up and she cooked them.

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’Tem vnicvhanat tv̨lkusē owekv, mvn hopuetake sulkēt owēpekv, hompvkvhanat.
She had to help since there were so many children who would need to eat.

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Ohwen mv vn-sister–oh–cvrvhv,
And my sister,

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naken kict ohkvya? Cvrvhv yowusat,
what did I say? Like my sister,

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vm vwolicat, cvrvhv vm vwolįcusat,
next to me, the sister right next to me,

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mvt pvlaknv okkosēt owemvts.
she washed dishes.

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Mvt pvlaknvn okkoset, onkat pvlaknv ahopoyet, fvlasko owat mvo–nake te?–vsse tis hayet, hetutē ocēn owat mvo
She washed dishes or looked for dishes, like cups or–what is it?–make tea, or see if we had ice, too,

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ahayet onkat uewv mvo avcanet, mowat mowen avnicet atak-aret owemvts.
she would be there preparing things or fetching water or be around helping, too.

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Ohwen cvcket mvt ’stowusat taklike tis hayet tak-vrēpet owemvts.
And my mother would be around making a few other things like biscuits.

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Mowen cvpuset mvn liket mvn ’tem punahoyēpen, pomeu
And my grandma would sit and visit, and we also

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“Puse, estowēt omvtē, fettv ’stowet areccet omvtē?” kicen,
would ask, “Grandma, how did it used to be, what did you used to do when you were outside?”

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onkat nak tis em pǫhēt onvkuce tis pum onayen,
or we would ask her several things or she would tell us stories

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noricę̄tt takfullēt owemvts.
as we were inside cooking.

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Ohwen cvcusucvlket mvt mvnę̄ttakusēt monkvt owemvt
And my little sisters were still very young

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’svmmon nak mowvkekot ont on owisen
and couldn’t do much,

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fettvn akkopvnaket, onkat cvcertaket mvt avkvtēcvkēt ont on hompetvn noricvkēt owemvts.
but they played outside and my brothers would keep an eye on them while we cooked.

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Ohwen vnstowusat ’shoktvlusat onkv, ohrolopē mvn
I was a little older,

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pale-hvmēcē witvtē, mvt vnet.
since I was only about ten.

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nak owv tis rascawet owvn em pohakn owat, raesencvwakit
I would have to carry in water for them

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onkat eto tis pok[ake]n owat, mvo eto fettv ocat racawit mowēt arit owemvts.
of if they were out of wood, I would carry in wood from outside for cooking.

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Ohwen ąyen, cvhoktalusē arat–nake te?–
Then as I got older

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“Pvlaknvn okkosvs!” cvkihocen, mvn, hiyowat kērrikv, pvlaknvn okkosit.
I was told to wash dishes and knew how, so I did the dishes.

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Ohwen hvtą vpvlwv ’culvkēpat, mv hoktvlēcat mv tat, vyvntot, rawakkę̄pet mvt cokv oh-onayet
And the older one would go lie down and read a book,

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nak-cokv oh-onvyę̄pet wakket hvtą hvnket pvlaknvn okkosat
she would lie there reading a book, and the one washing dishes

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Hokte Rakko kicimvt
that we called Hokte Rakko,

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hvtą ’setehvnahket, “Cēmeu vtotkvhanccē tat” kihcet ’setehvnaket ’swelakēt owemvts.
they would fuss at each other, “You’re supposed to work, too,” she said, and they’d fuss at each other.

106
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Dish towel tis ’setepoyakē owē ’stakwelaket
So they would get into a dish towel fight,

107
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Dish towel hvmmēct ’seterokafaket o.
slapping each other with a dish towel like this.

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Mamvt “Wikaks!” kicet on, mvt “Centat wakkētt oncces cē” kicē oken, welaket owemvts.
Mama used to tell them, “Quit!” and the other one would say, “You’re just laying around.” That’s what they’d go around saying.

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Owis, enhorrakat okē witvtē ē mowvkēt tawv.
But I think they were just lazy, just acting like that.

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Mowisen mowēt fullēt owemvts.
So that’s how we were.

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Pum vtotketv omvlkvt kerrēt.
We all knew what our duties were.

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Vnet ohrolopē pale-hvmken ostopohkaken pale-cahkēpen ostohkaken ohrolopē mvn cvhēckvtēt owēs.
I was born in the year 1954.

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Mowen mv cvheckvhant on, Mamvt ’snvrkesēt ont on.
I was to be born, Momma was expecting then.

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Ohwen cvrket mvn, “Cuko-pvlkv owen punpvlhoyē vpokeyat herekot os. Pētake sulkē punhakt os” maken. 6
My daddy said, “It isn’t good to be renting a house when we are having more children.

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“‘Tǫhkotok cuko hayvhanvyat tvlkēs” mahket mvn.
Anyway, I’ve got to build a house,” he said.

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Eufaula mvn hvsvklatkv fvccv vkērkv tuccēnat mahet owēs.
It is about three miles west of Eufaula.

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Mowen vkērkv hvmken lekothof fvccv vyetv.
And one mile going south.

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Mvn ēkvnv, ēkvn-satkv pale-ostvtēkvn nēsvtēt owēs, enrahkv cukpe-rakko cahkēpat.
He bought forty acres of land there for $5,000. [meant to say $500]

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Vtēkus owen nēsvtēt owēs.
That’s what it cost at that time.

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00:12:08,420 –> 00:12:14,450
Mowen fēket aret ont on, mv cuko hayvtēt owēs, mv vpokvhaneyat.
He paid for the land as he went along, and he made the house that we were going to live in.

121
00:12:14,450 –> 00:12:24,840
Ohwen mvn toknawv oce-mahekot onkv, cuko hayetv mv mvhahoyvtē mv Chilocco arē mv kerrēpvtē.
We didn’t have a lot of money, but he learned to build houses when he went to Chilocco.

122
00:12:24,840 –> 00:12:31,500
Mv hvtą em vtotketv mv tvlofv vtotkat mvt cuko esten siyet arēt owemvts. Mv enfēhokēt on.
He had a job and worked in town painting houses for people. They would pay him.

123
00:12:31,520 –> 00:12:38,000
Owen mvn mowatet, mvt ‘to-fokv nēset owē witvtēs.
Since he did that, that might have been how he bought lumber.

124
00:12:38,000 –> 00:12:45,110
Owen mv cuko–nake te?–halo-selkv kihocat mvn.
And that house–what is it?–what they call sheet metal.

125
00:12:45,120 –> 00:12:53,530
Takpvtakv hahyet, ’to-fokv takpvtakv hahyet ohwen, ’to-fokv mvo svpaklehcet ohwen,
He made the floor and put on the floor boards, and after that he stood the posts up,

126
00:12:53,560 –> 00:12:57,160
toknawv ‘senkvncapet owē witvtēts, mvn.
he must have been getting low on money then.

127
00:12:57,160 –> 00:13:02,610
Mvn mv halo-selkvn eshayvtēt owēs.
He made it with the sheet metal.

128
00:13:02,610 –> 00:13:17,180
Hospv owat ohwen ofv em vpvtakv owat oce-mahekok, mv em vpvtakv hvtke mvn em pvtapicēt owēmvts.
Like walls, we didn’t have many interior walls, but he would put up some of the sheetrock.

129
00:13:17,180 –> 00:13:22,170
Owen rvfo tat kvsvppēt owet ont owisen,
During the winter it was really cold,

130
00:13:22,170 –> 00:13:30,510
cvto-hiye totkvn ’tēcēt onkv, cvto-hiye rakkē ’stakhuericet omen
but we lit a stove heater, a big one that stood there,

131
00:13:30,510 –> 00:13:32,230
tvrretv ocēt owēmvts.
and we had a place to warm up.

132
00:13:32,240 –> 00:13:42,600
Ohwen ’svmmon kvsvppe-mahat tokot owemvt mowis pusulketok, mvn hvtą hompetv hak-cuko mvo cvto-hiye mvn ’snoricekv,
It was not that cold because there were so many of us, and in the kitchen as she was using a stove to cook with,

133
00:13:42,600 –> 00:13:47,700
hvt[e] hiyētok mvo ’tonko on kvsvppe-mahat tokot owēmvtt owisen.
[the stove] was still hot, so it was not that cold.

134
00:13:47,700 –> 00:13:50,370
Vkerricvkat cvtkole ont [owē] hak.
When I think about it, I’m feeling cold.

135
00:13:50,370 –> 00:14:00,110
Owisen mv ofv-wakketv owat–ofv-wakketv cukofv– tuccēnet owemvts.
But like the bedrooms, there were three rooms to sleep in.

136
00:14:00,110 –> 00:14:04,959
Pusųlkēt ont owat, tuccēnusēt ont on.
There were so many of us, but there were only three [rooms].

137
00:14:04,959 –> 00:14:18,720
Owen, cvcke mvt pētake hokkolēn ocekv, mvn hvtą vneu mv aenwakket owen, hvtą cvrvhvlke mvt tuccēnat
But my mother had two little ones, and I laid with her, too, but my three older sisters

138
00:14:18,750 –> 00:14:27,600
nockv ofv hvnken mvn nocicen. Owen cvcerwv ’culicat mvt vrahkv wakkēt owemvts mvn, cvpakkēt owēt on.
in that one bedroom. My older brother would sleep elsewhere because he was mean.

139
00:14:27,600 –> 00:14:36,720
Mv ’spum vcule monkat onkv, ’spum vcule-mahēt onkv, nak pukicēt on. Mvt ’spum vculepēt ok,
He was older, a lot older, and he used to say things to us. Because he was much older than us,

140
00:14:36,760 –> 00:14:43,280
“Vsin likvs!” onkat “Vsin wakkvs!” pukicēt on mvn nak ’svpucasepēt owēt onkv.
he would tell us to go sit over there, or go lay over there, like he was the boss of everything.

141
00:14:43,300 –> 00:14:50,305
Owen mvn vrahkvn wakkēpet ont cukofvn owemvts kowi[s] mvt taklik’tv ofvn mvn wakkēt owemvts.
He slept separate and I think it was the front room that he slept in.

142
00:14:50,305 –> 00:14:56,530
Owen cvcertake mvt vrahkvn mvo wakhokēt on mvn ’tenwakhokēt owemvts.
My two brothers laid separate together in that room.

143
00:14:56,530 –> 00:15:03,350
Owen cvrke mvo mvn arekv, hvtą hotusēt ok mvn vrahkvn wakkēpēt owemvts.
Also, there was my daddy, and he was there, too. And he slept elsewhere because he was so tired.

144
00:15:03,350 –> 00:15:06,780
Vtǫtket yafkekv hotosepēt owvten,
He worked all day until evening, so he would get so tired,

145
00:15:06,780 –> 00:15:11,760
owvtēt owet on maket, hvtą tvhikē owet on, hotosekv.
he would say, and he seemed gripey, because he was tired.

146
00:15:11,770 –> 00:15:15,150
Mowen vpokēt owemvts.
And that’s how we lived.

147
00:15:15,150 –> 00:15:20,600
Mowis ’stowē sekon ’puculakvtēt o.
But through it all, we grew up well.

148
00:15:20,600 –> 00:15:26,560
Puncuko-hvmēcvlke–vncuko-hvmēcvlke,
Our household–my household,

149
00:15:26,560 –> 00:15:32,320
pale-hvmken hokkolohkaket owēmvts.
there were twelve in it.

150
00:15:32,320 –> 00:15:35,327
Cvcertake osten o[c]vyvtēt owēs.
I really had four brothers.

151
00:15:35,327 –> 00:15:39,380
Hvmket– hokkolet sumhokēpvtēt ont os.
One– two are deceased.

152
00:15:39,400 –> 00:15:44,940
Momen cvrvhvlke tuccēnen ocit owēs.
And I have three older sisters.

153
00:15:44,950 –> 00:15:51,730
Owet cvcusucvlket hokkolen ocvyēt os.
And I have two younger sisters.

154
00:15:51,730 –> 00:15:57,980
Momet pusulkēt owēkv, Eufaula fvccvn mvn vpokēt on
And there were a lot of us living toward Eufaula,

155
00:15:57,980 –> 00:16:05,270
three miles west of Eufaula mvn cuko cvrke hayvtē mvn vpokēt owēt.
we lived three miles west of Eufaula in the house my father built.

156
00:16:05,270 –> 00:16:14,500
Ohrolopē Eholē mahen monkat Otvwoskv Rakko respokvhanat mahen
The month of November or maybe the last of October

157
00:16:14,500 –> 00:16:19,360
sukhv ’lēckv nettv oret owemvts.
is when it became hog-butchering time.

158
00:16:19,360 –> 00:16:26,700
Mohmen cvrket sukhv sųlkēn ocēt ont on
My dad had a lot of hogs,

159
00:16:26,720 –> 00:16:30,360
“Pulvwvkvhanekat” maket, mv pusulkēt o.
“We aren’t going to get hungry,” he he’d say, since there were a lot of us.

160
00:16:30,460 –> 00:16:32,800
Ocēt on, vfastēt owēmvts.
We had them, and we took care of them.

161
00:16:32,800 –> 00:16:36,150
Ohwen sukhv vfastv kihocen,
and they called him the hog farmer.

162
00:16:36,150 –> 00:16:42,970
hompetv mvo sukhv enhompetv nēset mvo aret owemvts.
And feed, too, he would go buy feed for the hogs.

163
00:16:42,970 –> 00:16:51,470
Netta hvmken sepēkon, vpvlwv puetake vpēyepē owemvts.
One day after we were gone, the other kids had left.

164
00:16:51,470 –> 00:16:58,690
Cvrket mv entvlkusēt ont, hvtą cvrvhv hoktvlēcus-mahat Hokte Fvske hocefkvt owemvts.
My father was by himself. My oldest sister was named Hokte Fvske.

165
00:16:58,690 –> 00:17:05,430
Yv vhakat mvt cvrket owen,
This picture, that’s my father,

166
00:17:05,430 –> 00:17:12,210
mv hoktēt cvrvhv hoktvlēcat os. Hokte Fvske hocefkvt owēs.
and the woman is my oldest sister. Her name is Hokte Fvske.

167
00:17:12,220 –> 00:17:18,690
Owen, sukhv rakkvhąnēn ’lēcaket os.
They have butchered the biggest hog.

168
00:17:18,690 –> 00:17:29,830
Ohwen hvsvtecahket–nake te?–warwicet hericvkvhant os, vpeswv vcayēcetv.
And they had cleaned it and–what is it?–were about to cut it up to store, to preserve the meat.

169
00:17:29,830 –> 00:17:37,570
Yv hiyowat mvt cvrket mvn ekvn enwaret os.
Now my father is severing the head.

170
00:17:37,590 –> 00:17:44,180
Cvrke mvt mv mēcetv kērrēt owvtēt owēs.
My father knew how to do that.

171
00:17:44,190 –> 00:17:50,850
Ohwen yvt cvrke ē-okhacēcēt owēt, vpelk-hayēt owemvts.
And here my father is acting silly, he used to joke around.

172
00:17:50,850 –> 00:17:59,140
Mv sukhv elehcet, mv encatvn eskvhanvceke owē hayet mēct os.
He butchered a hog and is acting like he is going to drink the blood.

173
00:17:59,140 –> 00:18:03,240
Vpēlv– “Vcvpelicvkekvs” pukowat owēs.
He is wanting us to laugh at him.

174
00:18:03,240 –> 00:18:13,850
Ohwen heyvt cvrket mvn hvlaten,
And here my father is holding it,

175
00:18:13,880 –> 00:18:17,750
mv cvrvhvt
and my older sister,

176
00:18:17,760 –> 00:18:22,850
mv catvn encvwakt os kowi, mvt catv ’svcvnke hayvkvhanat
I think they’re catching the blood to make blood pudding,

177
00:18:22,860 –> 00:18:26,890
catv ’svcvnke naket owat kērraccēt ok
you all know what blood pudding is,

178
00:18:26,900 –> 00:18:34,800
mvn hayvkvhanet ont on, cvrket “Encatv ’svkerrvs” kicet owvcoks, vcayēcet.
it looks like my father is telling her to save the blood.

179
00:18:34,800 –> 00:18:41,780
Owen yvt hiyowat mvn ekv enwarakekv, yvn vtvrvkēt ont
And now, since they have severed the head, they hung the hog up,

180
00:18:41,790 –> 00:18:47,250
sukhv selaket os, nvrkvpvn selahket,
and are slitting the hog, slitting it down the middle,

181
00:18:47,250 –> 00:18:55,590
mv ofv ocat, fekce owat avpvlvtvhant os. Eskerkēn mēcēt owemvts.
and in the inside all the intestines are going to slide down. He’d do it a certain way.

182
00:18:55,590 –> 00:19:02,660
Ofv enwahret owen–escvwetvn owat naken kicvkēt ont owa, mv?–
He would trim the inside–what is it called that you catch it with?–

183
00:19:02,660 –> 00:19:07,670
“tomopkv” kicat, “tomopkv” kicēt mvn–
it’s called “tomopkv” [or “’to-motke”], “tomopkv” we called it,

184
00:19:07,670 –> 00:19:13,890
nake te?–ue-vcvnkv owē, ue-saklopkv owēt owemvts kowvyē, mvn ’lecvn enlihcet mv fekce
what is it? it was a water container, I think it was like a washtub, and they put it right underneath so the intestines

185
00:19:13,910 –> 00:19:19,806
avpvlatet owemvts, hvsvthvkēn ēsso atakpvlvtiket lekvcwvhanekat.
would drop in cleanly and not fall on the ground and get dirty.

186
00:19:19,806 –> 00:19:22,170

187
00:19:22,170 –> 00:19:27,740
Ohwen yvn cvrket orēn hę̄rat vtotket os. ‘Safvckēt owemvts.
Then and, my father worked really hard. He was happy to do it.

188
00:19:27,750 –> 00:19:35,670
’Shotoset tvhiket onkot, mvn puhompvkuecvhanat owekv,
He didn’t become tired and gripey, because it was to feed us,

189
00:19:35,670 –> 00:19:38,640
mvn purket owēpekv,
because he was our father,

190
00:19:38,650 –> 00:19:41,770
puetake hompvkvhanat kowet mvn
he knew the kids had to eat,

191
00:19:41,780 –> 00:19:47,020
enheckv mowēt ont os.
his appearance shows it.

192
00:19:47,020 –> 00:19:53,490
Ohwen yvt mv sukhv ekv enwarat ohlict os.
And here he has placed the hog’s head he severed

193
00:19:53,540 –> 00:19:58,040
Mv hoktvlē takhuerat mvt cvrke nahvnket owemvts.
The elderly woman standing there was my father’s relative.

194
00:19:58,060 –> 00:20:07,560
Mvt em vnicen hvtą cvrvhv hoktē hoktvlēcat mvo mv ’tepaket ’mvnicakt os.
She helped him, and my oldest sister, too, they both helped him.

195
00:20:07,570 –> 00:20:16,740
Mv puncuko yopv nak tak-vpoken owat cvrke enliketv emonkvt ont os.
The back of our house has a lot of stuff there, that’s just the way dad lived.

196
00:20:16,740 –> 00:20:22,560
Owen hvtą yv sukhekv hvsvtecephoyen ohlikt os.
And here is the hog’s head that’s been cleaned.

197
00:20:22,560 –> 00:20:26,470
Sukhv hvsvtēcv mvt owimvts, vneu.
I was the hog cleaner, too.

198
00:20:26,490 –> 00:20:33,190
“Sukhv ekv hvsvtecvs!” cvkihocen, hvsvtēcit owemvts.
“Clean the hog’s head!” I was told, and I cleaned it.

199
00:20:33,200 –> 00:20:42,390
Ohwen yvt, sukhv warakat poyvkepvhąnust os.
And here they are almost finished cutting up the hog.

200
00:20:42,390 –> 00:20:49,670
Ele hvfe hokkolet ohwakhokēt os, hēcetsken owat, mvt os. Hēcatskv?
There are two hams lying here, if you look. Can you see?

201
00:20:49,670 –> 00:20:56,800
Mv hvnket ’sohhuerat ’stit owat kerre-mahvkot os.
I’m not sure who the other person standing here is.

202
00:20:56,820 –> 00:21:05,090
Owen yvn hvtą mv sukhv ele? Cvrke mvn yacēt owemvts, ’svkērrēt ont.
And here, those pig feet? My father liked them and he’d save them.

203
00:21:05,090 –> 00:21:09,790
Cvrvhv Hokte Fvske mvo ’mvnicet emonkt os.
My older sister Hokte Fvske is still helping him.

204
00:21:09,810 –> 00:21:22,780
Owen ’swelaket mvn poyahket, vpeswv ’tewarwicen mēcat mv vpes-hute ēkkuce-cuko kicē owē mvn, rvtēhēt owemvts.
And they finally finished it, and when they had cut up the meat, they put it all in what is called the smoke house.

205
00:21:22,790 –> 00:21:30,810
’Tewarwict mehcet, mv hvtą sukhv em vtēkē, nvce kicē witvkēt, hvtą ’le-hvfe,
They would cut it up, and the side of the hog, we might call it side meat, and the ham,

206
00:21:30,820 –> 00:21:38,440
vpeswv ’tewarwįcet mēcet hvtą,
they would cut up the meat,

207
00:21:38,440 –> 00:21:42,440
let’s see, fekce mvt hvtą
let’s see, the intestines,

208
00:21:42,440 –> 00:21:48,140
’tuce owakaten mvn, mv hoktvlē aepum vnicat mvn ēmet owemvts.
the kidneys and such, he would give it to the elderly woman who had helped us.

209
00:21:48,140 –> 00:21:55,450
Pum vnicakat hvtą ele-hvfe hvnket ēmet onkat, vpeswv ’stowusat enkvpicakēt owemvts.
He would give a ham to anyone who had helped us or share a little meat.

210
00:21:55,460 –> 00:22:01,140
Momen fullēt owemvts.
And that’s the way we were.

211
00:22:01,140 –> 00:22:04,190
’Mvtēkusen ’punayis.
That’s all I have to say.

212
00:22:04,190 –> 00:22:08,500
Pulvwvkvtē sekot owemvts.
We never went hungry.

213
00:22:08,500 –> 00:22:14,129
Estuce noceko tayet hvkįhket owen owat,
When a baby keeps crying and can’t sleep,

214
00:22:14,129 –> 00:22:20,830
monkat nǫcusat kowet ’stuce esē ’sarvken owen owat,
or you wish the baby would go to sleep, and you carry him/her around,

215
00:22:20,830 –> 00:22:25,140
yvhiketv eslupįcus owēt ocēt owēs.
there’s a very soothing song.

216
00:22:25,140 –> 00:22:27,110
Mvn yvhikvhant owis.
I’m going to sing that.

217
00:22:27,110 –> 00:22:32,580
Vkocǫknusēt owēt owisen, mvn yvhikvhant owis.
It’s shortened a little, but I’m going to sing it.

218
00:22:32,600 –> 00:22:34,750
Puse, puse tat,
Grandma, that grandma,

219
00:22:34,750 –> 00:22:39,140
Lucv hopokvn ayvntat.
Gone to look for turtles.

220
00:22:39,150 –> 00:22:40,990
Resvlvkekot
She hasn’t come back with them,

221
00:22:40,990 –> 00:22:43,260
’Svyomocken.
It’s gotten dark.

222
00:22:43,260 –> 00:22:47,180
Pēpe, nocv.
Baby, sleep.

223
00:22:47,180 –> 00:22:49,340
Puse, puse tat.
Grandma, that grandma!

224
00:22:49,340 –> 00:22:53,600
Lucv hopokvn ayvntat.
Gone to look for turtles.

225
00:22:53,600 –> 00:22:55,570
Resvlvkekot
She hasn’t come back with them,

226
00:22:55,570 –> 00:22:57,560
’Svyomocken.
It’s gotten dark.

227
00:22:57,590 –> 00:23:01,530
Pēpuce tat nocepvs cē.
O little baby, go ahead and sleep.

228
00:23:01,530 –> 00:23:03,460
Puse, puse tat,
Grandma, that grandma,

229
00:23:03,460 –> 00:23:07,510
Lucv hopokvn ayvntat.
Gone to look for turtles.

230
00:23:07,520 –> 00:23:09,230
Resvlvkekot
She hasn’t come back with them,

231
00:23:09,230 –> 00:23:11,250
’Svyomocken.
It’s gotten dark.

232
00:23:11,250 –> 00:23:15,140
Pēpe, nocv.
Baby, sleep.

233
00:23:15,140 –> 00:23:17,130
Puse, puse tat,
Grandma, that grandma,

234
00:23:17,130 –> 00:23:21,160
Lucv hopokvn ayvntat.
Gone to look for turtles.

235
00:23:21,160 –> 00:23:22,910
Resvlvkekot
She hasn’t come back with them,

236
00:23:22,910 –> 00:23:25,000
’Svyomocken.
It’s gotten dark.

237
00:23:25,000 –> 00:24:16,355
Pēpe, nocv. Nocv.
Baby, sleep. Sleep.